DEADLY ‘KISSING BUG’ HAS INVADED INDIANA

Deadly_Kissing_Bug.PNGThe Center for Disease Control and Protection is warning residents in the United States about a deadly bug that has made its way to 12 different states including Indiana. An insect know as a Triatominae, has been known to bite people in the face and infecting them with disease called Chagas. This disease has been dubbed as the deadly “Kissing Bug.”

These insects are not something to mess around with. Some of the symptoms of Chagas are fever, fatigue, swelling and a rash but it can be more serious causing strokes or even heart failure. Your pets aren’t even safe from the triatomine insects, as Chagas can actually give your pets heart disease.

I found what looked like a Triatominae in my house the other day. I can’t say for sure if it was, but it certainly looked like one. These bugs, when found inside your home, are typically located near the places your pets sleep, in areas of rodent infestation, and in/around beds and bedrooms (especially under or near mattresses or night stands.

The one I found was on my night stand. I didn’t take my chances, so I squished it…which apparently you aren’t supposed to do if you find one. According to the CDC:

If you find a bug you suspect is a triatomine, do not touch or squash it. Place a container on top of the bug, slide the bug inside, and fill it with rubbing alcohol or, if not available, freeze the bug in the container. Then, you may take it to your local extension service, health department, or a university laboratory for identification.

Surfaces that have come into contact with the bug should be cleaned with a solution made of 1 part bleach to 9 parts water (or 7 parts ethanol to 3 parts water).

If you want to take precautions to keep the triatomine bug out of  your house, the CDC recommends that you contact a licensed pest control operator before you use any insecticides to kill triatomine bugs. It should also be noted that roach hotels or other “bait” formulations do not work against these bugs. Other precautions to prevent house infestation recommended by the CDC include:

  • Sealing cracks and gaps around windows, walls, roofs, and doors
  • Removing wood, brush, and rock piles near your house
  • Using screens on doors and windows and repairing any holes or tears
  • If possible, making sure yard lights are not close to your house (lights can attract the bugs)
  • Sealing holes and cracks leading to the attic, crawl spaces below the house, and to the outside
  • Having pets sleep indoors, especially at night
  • Keeping your house and any outdoor pet resting areas clean, in addition to periodically checking both areas for the presence of bugs

(Source: CDC- Triatomine Bugs)

Philly ranked No. 1 in ‘Top 50 Bed Bug-Infested Cities’

download.jpgPHILADELPHIAtopbbs.jpg

June 3, 2019  –  Nate Homan

We’re number one!

…On a rather nasty list.

Philly scooped up the number one spot on the Terminix annual ranking of “Top 50 Bed Bug-Infested Cities” in the country ahead of summer vacation season and Bed Bug Awareness Week.

Where did the City of Brotherly Love rank last year? Second. Is this the first time Philly has been crowned most bed bug infested city? Nope. These insufferable little pests were snug as a bug in a rug in Philly in 2014 too.

“Bed bugs continue to pose concerns for public health, as their presence is felt across the country, in cities large and small,” Terminix Residential President Matthew Stevenson told BuisnessWire.

Rankings are determined through a compilation of bed bug-specific data of service calls reported at more than 300 Terminix branches across the country. The rankings represent Metropolitan Statistical Areas with the highest number of actual services between April 16, 2018 and April 15, 2019.

Thanks to increased travel, bed bug infestations have gone up since the 1990s.

Terminix research revealed that 22 percent of Americans polled have had a bed bug encounter, and that the odds of encountering them are much higher for those with children.

Despite the high incidence rates and increased awareness of bed bugs, this research shows nearly half of the country who travel do not know what precautions to take to guard against them.

Appearently, Philly is a hotbed for such individuals.

There are some pretty standard signs and symptoms of a bed bugs infestation.

Terminix experts warn that bed bugs can be found in more than just bedding and mattresses. They can easily hitchhike from place to place via personal belongings, such as jackets, purses and luggage, or hide in upholstered furniture and behind baseboards.

Infestations are notoriously difficult to treat. They can mature in about 35 days, and can survive seven months until a year.

Bed bugs are largely active at night, so infestations can be difficult to spot. Look for signs of the insects like shedded skins and blood spots on mattresses or sheets.

Terminix reccommends washing all clothing and other belongings, as recommended on the label, suspected of being exposed to bed bugs at high temperatures to help kill off the pests, and keeping potentially compromised luggage in a plastic bag to prevent the insects from spreading to other belongings.

Another telltale sign of bed bugs is their smell. The scent of their pheromones can be quite strong. It’s often described as a musty odor.

Oh yeah, another indicator that you might have an infestation: Burning raised itchy bumps with a clear center, or a dark center and lighter swollen surrounding area scattered in zigzag patterns or in a line. The bite itself is pretty much painless. On average, they suck blood for a solid 10 minutes while their victim sleeps.

Here are some tips to mitigate the risk of being bitten or transporting bed bugs:

Check hotel headboards, mattresses and box springs for live bed bugs, their exoskeletons and or dark blood spots.

While full-grown, bed bugs are about the size, shape and color of an apple seed. Travelers should also look for newly hatched nymphs, which are cream-colored and the size of letters on a penny, as well as small translucent eggs, which may be found in the tucks and folds of sheets.

Hang all clothing. Leave nothing lying on the bed or furniture.

Avoid storing clothing in a hotel’s furniture drawers.

Store suitcases on a luggage rack as far away from the bed as possible.

Vacuum suitcases when returning home, and immediately wash clothing in hot water.

Between trips, store luggage in a sealed plastic bag in a garage or basement away from bedrooms.

Bedbugs: What you need to know to avoid bedbugs on vacation

What to do when you check-in a hotel

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WATE) June 10, 2019 – Don Dare – As you head out for your vacation this summer, be vigilant about checking for bedbugs. Pest control professionals report that a majority of their business is treating hotels.

Bedbugs can be found anywhere, from luxury hotels to a summer camp. Imagine you’re on that vacation you have looked forward to, only to wake up your first morning covered in bedbug bites. The insects are so tiny, they’re difficult to see, but the bites are painful.

Bedbugs can be found almost everywhere

Experts say bedbugs like to hide out in mattresses near the bed boards. Dr. Brittany Campbell is an entomologist. She studies insects for the National Pest Management Association.

“We found that 97 percent of pest control professionals were treating for bedbugs in the United States,” Campbell said. “They can be found, I know this is surprising, but almost anywhere. They will bite you. Their bite can cause an allergic reaction. It can cause a skin reaction. Everyone’s immune system is different., but you can have an allergic reaction. In severe cases, those reactions can create blisters.”

Campbell says bedbugs are resilient creatures. They’ve developed resistance to the pesticides we have on the market now.

“They’re very difficult to control yourself, so I really encourage you to reach out to a professional,” she said.

Killing bedbugs isn’t easy

Mark Nadolski with Russell’s Pest Control says bedbugs hide in the smallest places in and around beds and box springs, and killing them isn’t easy.

How to check for bedbugs in a hotel

“I would really encourage you to go to the bed, pull down the sheets. Go all the way down to the mattress. Look in the mattress seams. That’s where bed bugs are going to hide,” she said.

If you find bedbugs in your room while on vacation, take a picture of them to show to the manager and insist on another room. If you think you have brought the bugs home with you from your vacation, it’s best to get professional help to zap an infestation.

More Than 100,000 Americans Urge EPA To Restrict Unnecessary Use of Monsanto’s Weedkiller on Oats

EWG
WASHINGTON – JUNE 7, 2019 – By Alex Formuzis alex@ewg.org

This week, more than 100,000 Americans officially joined EWG and 20 companies calling on the Environmental Protection Agency to significantly restrict the use of Monsanto’s weedkiller glyphosate on oats as a pre-harvest drying agent.

A coalition of companies and public interest groups, led by EWG and Megafood, gathered 104,952 signatures on online petitions to the EPA, urging the agency to lower the tolerance limit of glyphosate in oats and prohibit its pre-harvest use.  The names of those who signed the petitions were submitted to EPA on Wednesday.

The EPA’s legal limit for glyphosate residues on oats is 30 parts per million, or ppm. The petition, first filed last September, asks the agency to set a more protective standard of 0.1 ppm, which was the legal limit in 1993.

glyphosate_plow

“Administrator Andrew Wheeler and the EPA could quickly remove one of the more concerning routes of dietary exposure to glyphosate for children by restricting the unnecessary use of glyphosate on oats,” said EWG Legislative Director Colin O’Neil. “Americans are demanding the agency act to protect the public and the food supply from being contaminated with this toxic weedkiller linked to cancer.”

“It’s hard to find 100,000 people who agree on anything,” O’Neil said. “But when it comes to feeding themselves and their families, they agree that we should not have to worry whether eating healthy, oat-based foods for breakfast could come with a dose of glyphosate.”

The petition was amended this week and submitted to the EPA docket to include additional companies that have signed on since last year.

Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Bayer-Monsanto’s Roundup, is the most widely used pesticide in the world. It is largely used as a weedkiller on genetically modified corn and soybeans. But it is increasingly being used for crop management and applied pre-harvest to a number of non-genetically engineered crops, including oats.

Glyphosate kills the crop, drying it out so it can be harvested sooner than if the plant were allowed to die naturally. This is very likely one of the leading sources of dietary exposure for people who consume foods made with oat-based foods, like cereal and oatmeal.

Two rounds of laboratory tests commissioned by EWG found glyphosate in nearly every sample of oat-based cereal and other breakfast products at levels higher than what EWG scientists consider protective for children’s health with an adequate margin of safety.

On June 12, EWG will release results of its latest tests, which will include additional oat-based cereals and other foods that were not analyzed for glyphosate in the two earlier rounds.

2017 study by a team of California scientists estimate that between 2014 and 2016, at least 70 percent of American adults surveyed had detectable levels of the cancer-causing weedkiller in their bodies. That compares to 12 percent in American adults between 1993 and 1996, just before the use of glyphosate started to surge with the advent of GMO crops designed to withstand direct application of the chemical.

In 2015, 17 of the world’s top cancer researchers convened by the International Agency for Research on Cancer reviewed hundreds of studies on glyphosate and voted unanimously to classify the weedkiller as “probably carcinogenic to humans.” In 2017, California added glyphosate to its official list of chemicals known to cause cancer.

These companies are cosigners of the petition to the EPA: MegaFood, Ben & Jerry’s, Stonyfield Farm, MOM’s Organic Market, Nature’s Path, One Degree Organic Foods, National Co+op Grocers, Happy Family Organics, Amy’s Kitchen, Clif Bar & Company, Earth’s Best Organic, GrandyOats, INFRA, KIND Healthy Snacks, Lundberg Family Farms, Organic Valley, Patagonia Provisions, PCC Community Markets, Foodstirs and Kamut International, Ltd.

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The Environmental Working Group is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization that empowers people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. Through research, advocacy and unique education tools, EWG drives consumer choice and civic action.

Glyphosate in Cereal: Monsanto’s Weedkiller Detected at Alarming Levels, Report Says

Dr_Axe.pngGlyphosate-in-Cereal_HEADER.jpg

June 12, 2019 By Christine Ruggeri, CHHC

Environmental Working Group (EWG) just released its third round of 2019 test results measuring glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup weed killer, in popular oat-based cereals and foods.

When the nonprofit organization released similar results last year, two companies, Quaker and General Mills, told the public it had no reason to worry about traces of glyphosate in their products.

After three rounds of testing that proves glyphosate is in popular cereal products, it seems that’s not the case. In fact, in the newest test results, the two highest levels of glyphosate were found in Honey Nut Cheerios Medley Crunch and Cheerios.


Glyphosate in Cereal

In the latest batch of testing that confirmed and amplified the findings from tests done in July and October of last year, all but four of the products tested contained levels of the potentially-carcinogenic weed-killing chemical above 160 parts per billion (ppb), the health benchmark set by EWG.

These findings come about one year after EWG released two series of tests measuring glyphosate in popular children’s breakfast products. That’s when General Mills and Quaker Oats Company immediately went on the defensive, claiming glyphosate levels found in its foods fell within regulatory limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

That may be true, but many public health experts believe the levels of allowable glyphosate in food are far too high and don’t properly protect human health. Previously, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) calculations suggest that 1- to 2-year-old children likely experience the highest exposure to glyphosate, the potential cancer-causing chemical used in Monsanto’s Roundup. And according to the agency’s risk assessment, the exposure level is 230 times greater than EWG’s health benchmark of 160 ppb.

In the May 2019 batch of testing, EWG commissioned Anresco Laboratories to test a range of oat-based products, including 300 grams each of 21 oat-based cereals, snack bars, granolas and instant oats made by General Mills and Quaker. Of the 21 products tested, those with the highest levels of glyphosate include:

  • Honey Nut Cheerios Medley Crunch (833 ppb)
  • Nature Valley Crunchy Granola Bars, Maple Brown Sugar (566 ppb)
  • Nature Valley Granola Cups, Almond Butter (529 ppb)
  • Chocolate Peanut Butter Cheerios (400 ppb)
  • Nature Valley Baked Oat Bites (389 ppb)
  • Nature Valley Crunchy Granola Bars, Oats and Honey (320 ppb)
  • Nature Valley Crunchy Granola Bars, Peanut Butter (312 ppb)
  • Nature Valley Granola Cups, Peanut Butter Chocolate (297 ppb)
  • Nature Valley Fruit & Nut Chewy Trail Mix Granola Bars, Dark Chocolate Cherry (275 ppb)
  • Nature Valley Granola Protein Oats n Dark Chocolate (261 ppb)
  • Multi Grain Cheerios (216 ppb)
  • Nature Valley Soft-Baked Oatmeal Squares, Blueberry (206 ppb)
  • Fiber One Oatmeal Raisin Soft-Baked Cookies (204 ppb)
  • Nature Valley Granola Peanut Butter Creamy & Crunchy (198 ppb)
  • Nature Valley Biscuits with Almond Butter (194 ppb)

These tested products contain glyphosate at levels well above EWG’s safety standard of 160 ppb.


A Look at Previous Glyphosate in Cereal Testing

Last year, EWG set a more stringent health benchmark for daily exposure to glyphosate in foods than the EPA and tested an initial batch of products. Considering EWG’s standard of 160 parts per billion (ppb), after two rounds of testing, the following products exceeded that limit in one or both samples tested, with the starred products exceeding 400 ppb:

  • Granola
    • Back to Nature Classic Granola*
    • Quaker Simply Granola Oats, Honey, Raisins & Almonds*
    • Nature Valley Granola Protein Oats ‘n Honey
  • Instant Oats
    • Giant Instant Oatmeal, Original Flavor*
    • Quaker Dinosaur Eggs, Brown Sugar, Instant Oatmeal*
    • Umpqua Oats, Maple Pecan
    • Market Pantry Instant Oatmeal, Strawberries & Cream
  • Oat Breakfast Cereals
    • Cheerios Toasted Whole Grain Oat Cereal*
    • Lucky Charms*
    • Barbara’s Muligrain Spoonfuls, Original Cereal
    • Kellogg’s Cracklin’ Oat Bran Oat Cereal
  • Snack Bars
    • Nature Valley Crunchy Granola Bars, Oats ‘n Honey
  • Whole Oats
    • Quaker Steel Cut Oats*
    • Quaker Old Fashioned Oats
    • Bob’s Red Mill Steel Cut Oats

Companies negatively affected by these tests may point to the EPA’s legal limit for glyphosate in oats, which is 30 parts per million. But since this outdated standard was set in 2008, the International Agency for Research on Cancer labeled glyphosate as “probably carcinogenic” and the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment categorized it as a “chemical known to the state to cause cancer.”

EWG suggests that the solution is simple – keep chemicals linked to cancer out of children’s food. This may start with the EPA sharply limiting glyphosate residues allowed on oats and prohibiting the chemical’s use as a pre-harvest drying agent.

Since last August, there have been three separate verdicts against Bayer-Monsanto, the makers of Roundup. Jurors in California awarded more than 2.2 billion dollars over claims that the toxic weedkiller caused cancer and Monsanto knew about this risk for decades, but went to extraordinary lengths to cover it up.

What does this mean for our children? Without some serious changes made to the food industry and EPA standards, they’ll continue to ingest potentially toxic levels of glyphosate for breakfast. Maybe this will be the last straw for consumers?

EWG turned to Eurofins, a nationally recognized lab with extensive experience testing for chemicals. This testing involved measuring the amount of glyphosate found in popular products containing oats. What is this a big deal? I’m glad you ask …

Glyphosate in cereal - Dr. Axe

Previous research suggests that glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup, is linked to the development of non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. The bad news? Tests have detected it in all but two of 45 non-organic product samples. The list of products tested includes Cheerios, Lucky Charms, Nature Valley granola bars and Quaker oats.

Alexis Temkin, PhD, an EWG toxicologist and the author of the report, expressed her concerns about these findings. “Parents shouldn’t worry about whether feeding their children healthy oat foods will also expose them to a chemical linked to cancer. The government must take steps to protect our vulnerable populations,” she said.

Until then, EWG and 19 food companies have delivered more than 80,000 names on a petition to the EPA demanding that they sharply limit glyphosate residues in oat products and prohibit its use as a preharvest drying agent.


Why Is Glyphosate in Our Food? 

Why is there glyphosate in our food? According to the U.S. Geological Survey, 250 million pounds of glyphosate are sprayed on American crops each year. Glyphosate is primarily used on Roundup Ready corn and soybeans that are genetically modified to withstand the herbicide.

Glyphosate is a systemic herbicide, meaning it’s taken up inside of the plant, including the parts livestock and humans wind up eating.

And on top of that, glyphosate is sprayed on other non-GMO crops, like wheat, oats, barley and beans, right before harvest. Farmers sometimes call this “burning down” the crops and do this to kill the food plants and dry them out so that they can be harvested sooner.


How Much Glyphosate Is Too Much? 

Why do we have to pay attention to glyphosate levels in our food? The simple answer is that glyphosate is linked to an elevated risk of cancer. In fact, the World Health Organization categorizes the weed-killing chemical as “probably carcinogenic in humans.”

So, really, any amount of glyphosate in our food is concerning, especially when it’s found in our children’s food. (And especially since children consume it during critical stages of development.)

So how did EWG come up with the limit for child glyphosate exposure? Using a cancer risk assessment developed by California state scientists, EWG calculated that glyphosate levels above 160 parts per billion (ppb) are considered too high for children. To break that down into simpler terms — a child should not ingest more than 0.01 milligrams of glyphosate per day.

How did tEWG come up with this health benchmark? Under California’s Proposition 65 registry of chemicals known to cause cancer, the “No Significant Risk Level” for glyphosate for the average adult weighing about 154 pounds is 1.1 milligrams per day. This safety level is more than 60 times lower than the standards set by the EPA.

To calculate the recommendation for children, EWG took California’s increased lifetime risk of cancer of one in 1 million (which is the number used for many cancer-causing drinking water contaminants), and added a 10-fold margin of safety, which is recommended by the federal Food Quality Protection Act to support children and developing fetuses that have an increased susceptibility to carcinogens. This is how EWG reached the safety limit of 0.01 milligrams of glyphosate per day for children.

EWG’s health benchmark concerning the amount of glyphosate that poses a threat in our food is much more stringent than what the EPA allows. Although this amount of glyphosate present in oat products doesn’t seem like much in one portion, imagine consuming that amount every day over a lifetime. Exposure to this toxic herbicide will certainly accumulate over time, which is worrisome, to say the least.

“The concern about glyphosate is for long-term exposure. As most health agencies would say, a single portion would not cause deleterious effects,” explains Olga Naidenko, PhD, EWG’s senior science advisor for children’s health. “But think about eating popular foods such as oatmeal every day, or almost every day — that’s when, according to scientific assessments, such amounts of glyphosate might pose health harm.”

And there is some controversy over whether or not we can trust government regulators to make sure the food we eat is safe. This past April, internal emails obtained by the nonprofit US Right to Know revealed that the FDA has been testing food for glyphosate for two years and found “a fair amount.” But these findings haven’t been released to the public. According to The Guardian, the news outlet that obtained these internal documents, an FDA chemist wrote: “I have brought wheat crackers, granola cereal and corn meal from home and there’s a fair amount in all of them.”

According to Naidenko, “It is essential for companies to take action and choose oats grown without herbicides. This can be done, and EWG urges government agencies such as the EPA, and companies to restrict the use of herbicides that end up in food.”


Glyphosate in Cereal: Organic vs. Non-Organic Products

What about organic cereals and oats? EWG findings suggest that organic products contain significantly less glyphosate that non-organic products. To be exact, 31 out of 45 conventional product samples contained glyphosate levels at or higher than 160 ppb, while 5 out of 16 organic brand products registered low levels of glyphosate (10 to 30 ppb). Of all the organic products tested, none of them contained a level of glyphosate anywhere near the EWG benchmark of 160 ppb.

Glyphosate can get into organic foods by drifting from nearby fields that grow conventional crops. Organic products may also be cross-contaminated during processing at a facility that also handles conventional crops.

While glyphosate was detected in some organic oat products, the levels were much, much lower than conventional products, or non-existent. So it looks like the rule still stands — to avoid increased exposure to cancer-causing chemicals like glyphosate, choose organic.


Final Thoughts on Glyphosate in Cereal

  • EWG commissioned independent laboratory tests to measure the levels of glyphosate present in popular oat-based products. Scientists found that almost three-fourths of the conventionally grown products contained glyphosate levels that are higher than what EWG considers safe for children.
  • Feeding your family clean, healthy meals may already feel like a daily challenge. We shouldn’t have to worry about whether or not our seemingly healthy choices contain toxic herbicides.
  • To join EWG to get glyphosate out of our food, take action here.

Bed bug infestations are only getting worse — here’s why they’re so hard to kill

  • Bed bugs can stow away on your clothes, bags, and mattresses, infest your home, and lay thousands of eggs in the process.
  • They feed on human blood and swell to twice their body weight.
  • Despite our best efforts, bed bugs are hard to kill and infestations are only getting worse.
  • Part of the problem is that bed bugs are developing resistance to pesticides, and experts worry we’re running out of options.

The children were right. A gruesome creature lurks under your bed. And yes, it wants to suck your blood…swelling to twice its size in the process.

Its name? Cimex lectularius — aka the common bed bug.

Turns out these creatures have tormented humans for thousands of years. Ancient Egyptians, for example, used spells to try and fight the insect hordes. But to no avail. And while our weapons have come a long way since spell casting … we’re struggling more than ever to fend off these pesky pests.

In the 20th century, humans developed a new weapon against the bed bug. Toxic chemicals. Pesticides like DDT nearly wiped out entire populations in most Western countries. But even that wasn’t enough. By the turn of the millennium, bed bug populations resurged worldwide. And this time, they had new weapons against us. Like 15% thicker skin — to better protect against harmful pesticides. And enzymes called esterases and oxidizes. Which break down common insecticides, making them useless. In fact, researchers worry we’re running out of effective insecticides!

If that’s not terrifying enough, consider this: Just a few bed bugs can quickly turn into a dangerous infestation. Let’s say a single female spots you in the local movie theater … and hitches a ride home on your clothes. Here’s the problem: She’s pregnant. And will lay hundreds of eggs. Within just a few months, that lonesome bed bug can turn into thousands.

But most victims won’t even notice until it’s too late. Since their flat, plate-like bodies let bed bugs vanish into impossibly tight nooks and crannies. So it’s no wonder infestations are out of control! From 2004 to 2009, the New York City council reported a 2,000% increase in bedbug complaints! And although they don’t transmit disease, bed bug bites are bad news.

In one case, a 60-year-old man needed to be hospitalized for blood loss. Bed bugs can also trigger itchy rashes, which can cause skin infections at best … and deadly allergic reactions at worse. The good news is you CAN rid your home of these pests. Experts recommend hiring professional exterminators to heat your home to extreme temperatures.

The bad news? You’ll have to shell out $800 to $1,200 a pop to clear your apartment.

So until we discover a safe but cheaper way to take out every last one…it won’t be so easy to sleep tight and not let the bed bugs bite.

by Gina Echevarria and Shira Polan  Dec. 28, 2018

New Survey Shows Americans Taking Action Against Bed Bugs

National Pest Management Association Urges Continued Vigilance During Bed Bug Awareness Week

FAIRFAX, Va. (April 16, 2014) – A majority of Americans have begun taking precautions against the spread of bed bugs, according to the 2014 Bed Bug Awareness Week survey conducted online in the U.S. by Harris Poll on behalf of the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) in March 2014 among over 2,000 U.S. adults ages 18+. The survey, which found nearly three in five (59%) Americans take some kind of precaution against bed bugs, is being released in conjunction with Bed Bug Awareness Week (April 20-26), a national observance to help spread awareness about bed bugs and what people can do to curb infestations.

Bed bugs are known for their hitchhiking capabilities and are easily transported, making them an elusive pest and formidable opponent. In fact, bed bugs are considered one of the most difficult pests to control by professionals, due in part to their quick breeding capabilities and tendency to hide in small, dark crevices, often unseen by the human eye, such as behind headboards and baseboards, as well as inside electrical outlets and box springs. Depending on the scope of an infestation, it can take several treatments to fully eradicate the bugs.

Industry experts agree that public awareness is key in quelling infestations. “Education and vigilance are the first steps to help stop the spread of bed bugs, and we’re pleased and encouraged to hear that so many Americans are becoming more aware of their surroundings and taking measures to protect against this troublesome pest,” said Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for NPMA. “We hope the public will use Bed Bug Awareness Week as an opportunity to brush up on prevention techniques—especially as we head into the busy summer travel season.”

Below are highlights from the survey:

59 percent of all U.S. adults take some kind of precaution against bed bug infestations.
34 percent inspect sheets, mattress pads and mattresses for signs of bed bugs upon checking into a hotel
33 percent wash all clothes in hot water after returning home from a vacation
29 percent avoid visiting homes or locations that have had a bed bug infestation
28 percent remain vigilant of where they place their belongings when in public places
12 percent vacuum suitcases after returning home from vacation
8 percent keep their suitcases in a plastic trash bag or protective cover for the duration of their hotel stays
If they suspected a bed bug infestation in their home, 95 percent of U.S. adults would do something to alleviate the problem.
69 percent would wash their sheets and bedding in hot water
64 percent would clean and vacuum their bedrooms
62 percent would contact a pest professional/exterminator
40 percent would buy an over-the-counter bed bug removal product
30 percent would throw away their mattress and purchase a new one
More information, including bed bug biology, prevention tips and best practices can be found on AllThingsBedBugs.org.

The NPMA, a non-profit organization with more than 7,000 members, was established in 1933 to support the pest management industry’s commitment to the protection of public health, food and property. For more information, visit PestWorld.org.

Survey Methodology
This survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of the National Pest Management Association from March 11-13, 2014 among 2,037 adults ages 18 and older. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.

Pest Control Advice When Buying a New Home
When purchasing a home, certain steps must be taken to ensure things go smoothly. Aside from any cosmetic updates, it’s important to also account for any problems that may not be visible to the naked eye. That’s why a new home pest inspection is so important.

Copyright ©2019 National Pest Management Association

Bed bug incident reported at Ansonia Middle School

Ansonia_Middle
ANSONIA, Conn. (WTNH) – June 4, 2019 — There is a bed bug outbreak at a middle school in Ansonia.

A parent contacted News 8 after a recording about the bed bug outbreak was sent out to the school community by the Ansonia Middle School principal on Monday.

The recording advises parents that a letter will be going home with students about a recent incident involving a single insect that was found in one of the exam room’s in the school nurse’s office.

The insect was removed and after an analysis from state officials, it was determined that the insect was common bed bug.

To ensure that the school is free of any bed bugs, an inspection will be conducted by a pest control specialist, as well as a follow up treatment to effective areas.

A letter from Dr. Carol Merlone, Ansonia Superintendent of Schools, reads:

A single bed bug was found in Ansonia Middle School on Monday, June 3, and a licensed pest control specialist determined today, June 4, that there isn’t any evidence that there are any other bed bugs in the school.

“A letter was sent home with Ansonia Middle School students, notifying parents and guardians about this isolated incident,” Dr. Carol Merlone, Superintendent of Schools, reported this afternoon. She said the school nurse found an insect in one of the exam rooms in her office, and the insect was removed from the exam room and immediately sent for analysis to the Department of Entomology at the Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station in New Haven.  It was determined that the insect was a “common” bed bug, Dr. Merlone said. She added that the Valley Health Department was also notified.

The parent letter provided information about bed bugs, including that they do not carry diseases but are a nuisance; that they cannot survive out of their own environment; and that schools are not likely to have a major infestation but rather may have a few bugs which are carried by students or adults. Anyone with additional questions about bed bugs may call the Naugatuck Valley Health District at (203) 881-3255.

“We are working with the student and the family,” Dr. Merlone said, adding that the licensed pest control specialist will return to ensure that the school remains free of bed bugs.

The final day of the school year is this Friday, June 7.

Houston ranked No. 12 in ‘most bed bug-infested cities’ list

abc

HOUSTON, Texas — June 4, 2019

Houston has made the list for one of the worst cities to experience bed bugs.

Terminix released the list saying that as the summer heat ramps up, bed begs will become more of an issue.

Philadelphia has the worst bed bug problem in the country, according to Terminix.

The numbers were based on the number of service calls conducted in 2018.

Terminix says bed bugs are not only problems at home, they are a serious pest during summer travel.

The company says don’t just check hotel room mattresses and sheets for the apple seed-sized bugs, also look for cream-colored nymphs and small translucent eggs.

They recommend hanging all clothing, not using the furniture drawers, storing suitcases on a luggage rack and immediately washing clothes in hot water when you get home.

Family claims Jacksonville day care has bedbugs, DCF investigating

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – June 4, 2019

A local father says a local day care kicked his son out of school after he and his wife complained that the center had bedbugs.

“It’s been several times that he came home with bug bites,” said Jacksonville father Ian Williams.

Williams tells Action News Jax Ryan Nelson his son came home with bites several times since January from the Saint Stephen Child Care and Learning Center.

But on May 30, he says his wife found one of the bedbugs crawling on their son at the facility.

Action News Jax obtained letters from the center to the Williams family, which show it did not believe there was an infestation.

However, it immediately removed kids from the classroom and used a bug fogger.

In another letter, the day care ended its relationship with the family citing respect issues, and violations of its rules.

The Williams family has a different interpretation of that letter.

“Pretty much their position was, ‘We’d rather sweep it under the rug and keep it quiet than to actually address the problem,’” said Williams.

Nelson went to the day care asking if there was anything they could like to say. A manager told Nelson it was under investigation, before asking him to leave.

We looked through DCF records, and found records of more than a dozen inspections in the past three years.

While there were other noncompliance issues found, none of them dealt with bugs or cleanliness issues.

“When a kid comes home and complain about getting bit by bugs, and we actually go pick him up, and there’s bugs actually crawling on him, you know, any parent is going to have a concern about that,” said Williams.

The family said it was under DCF investigation. DCF confirms it is looking into the matter.