Join Us And “Say-No-To-Pesticides™️”

 

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Pesticide Risks Are Real.

Pesticides affect you and me.

We are subject to pesticide and other chemical residuals everywhere.

Restaurants, businesses, parks, public gardens, and golf courses all use pesticides.

And most important, our children’s schools use herbicides outside and pesticides inside.

Toxins are everywhere.

Even power plants, and vehicles create fine air polluting particles that affect us.

 

 

Wake-Up Call

We’re living in a sick nation where over 40% of us has some form of diabetes or obesity.

Approximately 84% of all chronic diseases are from environmental toxins.

Long-term exposure to toxins accumulates deep in the tissues and cells of our bodies.

As a result, cellular dysfunction which leads to problems with our immune systems.

How many of us could be battling a toxic issue right now and not know it?

It is possible to co-exist with a reckless industry that endangers public health?

Not for long.

A Step in the Right Direction

At 46 years young, Dewayne Johnson is facing terminal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

He worked as a public-school groundskeeper in California.

Spraying Monsanto’s weed killer glyphosate (Roundup) was one of his responsibilities.

The jury determined that glyphosate caused Mr. Johnson’s cancer.

And the pesticide-manufacturer failed to warn of the health hazards from his exposure.

He won a landmark case against Monsanto for $289 million that will go down in history.

Another Move in The Right Direction

Recently, the EPA was directed to complete its proposed ban on the toxic pesticide chlorpyrifos.

Pesticide persistence affects our entire food chain.

The destruction of bio-diversity in our soils is a grave concern.

Without healthy food, we suffer from diseases and die younger than we should.

On Aug. 15, The Environmental Working Group (EWG), found glyphosate in all but five of 29 oat-based foods.

This included Cheerios, America’s babies favorite finger food, which was recently banned in day cares across the nation.

This may take us many years to reverse.

What does all this have to do with bed bugs?

Adding more pesticides to our environment to get rid of bed bugs is plain irresponsible.

Prevention Is the Cure

Before the advent of artificial and toxic everything, we used what was available in and on the earth.

We used natural resources from the ground, water or plants and not man-made chemicals.

Today, almost everything we use is man-made and contains toxins.

Our sensitive environments can’t risk adding any more toxins.

And people are in search for alternatives.

Knowing this, we developed a safe alternative to pesticides.

Doing Our Part

We all have to do our part to reverse toxins in our environments and reduce our toxic load.

Not only for you and me but for, our children, grandchildren and those who come after.

Our concern for this helped us develop products that are safe to use in any environment.

Especially useful in senior care facilities where health is delicate.

Great for Airbnb, Bed and Breakfasts, Hotels, Motels, or any facility that hosts guests.

Frequent travelers, or busy homes can sleep a lot easier with our products.

Kiltronx products kill bed bugs, without toxins, while preventing future infestations.

Our company’s mission is critical to ensuring a healthy future for all.

Thank you for helping protect our children, families and our future.

[1] http://www.who.int/topics/pesticides/en/

[2] http://factorgmo.com/en/

[3] http://www.panna.org/pesticide-problem/pesticides-big-picture

[4] https://usrtk.org/pesticides/tests-show-monsanto-weed-killer-in-cheerios-other-popular-foods/

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