Bed Bug Allegedly Found On Montreal STM Bus (Video)

A brief video submitted to MTL Blog by Instagram user @sssareenak shows what appears to be a bed bug crawling across the seat of an STM bus in Montreal. The video was taken on Friday July 5th on the 968 bus, which runs between the Côte-Vertu orange line metro station and the Gare Roxboro-Pierrefonds.

An exterminator tells MTL Blog that though the video is too low quality to determine with 100% certainty the identity of the bug, a quick assessment suggests it is, indeed, a bed bug.

We reached out to the STM to inquire specifically about bed bugs on this bus line and, more generally, bed bugs on any vehicle in the STM network.

In response, an agency spokesperson explained only that “we regularly evaluate the cleanliness of buses and trains. When such a situation is brought to our attention, we quickly remove the vehicle from service and take the necessary measures.”

They further explain that bus interiors are washed every 42 days.

The short video of the alleged bed bug is below:

If this is, in fact, a bed bug, this would not be the first time the insect was found on public property.

Last year, an infestation of bed bugs at the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ) forced officials to remove most upholstered furniture from the enormous complex in downtown Montreal.

Plastic chairs replaced couches until exterminators were able to eradicate the pests.

Bed bugs, according to a page on the government of Canada website, “are small, wingless insects that feed on the blood of people and animals while they sleep.”

“A bedbug bite can take as long as 14 days to appear, depending on the person. While bites can happen anywhere on the skin, they are often found on the face, neck, arms, legs, and chest.”

There is no indication that bed bugs have spread on the STM network. This appears to have been an isolated incident.

Bedbugs found in Hempstead Town building, officials say – Long Island Nassau County

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Bedbugs were found at town offices on North Franklin Street in Hempstead. Photo Credit: Town of Hempstead

Hempstead Tax Receiver Don Clavin on Thursday called on the town to close and fumigate a town office building that is infested with bedbugs.

Employees first spotted the bloodsucking pests yesterday, and since then workers have found dozens of them crawling on furniture and scaling the walls of the building  on North Franklin Street , where more than 200 town employees work and where some 55,000 members of the public pass through annually, Clavin said.

“Do what’s right,” he said at a news conference on Thursday, flanked by the town’s CSEA union president Theresa Kohutka. “Shut the building down, get it rectified, get it clean, and let these hardworking men and women come to this building in a clean safe environment.”

Clavin, a Republican, is challenging Democratic Supervisor Laura Gillen for her seat this fall.

Mike Fricchione, a spokesman for Gillen, said in a statement Thursday that exterminators treated the affected area of the building Wednesday night and would do so again Thursday night.

Fricchione accused Clavin of politicizing the infestation.

“This is not the first time departments, including the Tax Receiver’s Office, have been notified of an isolated report of bedbugs in an office space, so it’s curious why the Tax Receiver would this time request that the entire building be shut down,” Fricchione said. “This administration does not believe in scaring the public and will continue following all appropriate protocols and procedures relating to bedbugs.”

Bedbugs are brown, apple-seed sized critters that feed on sleeping humans and other animals, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. They are hard to eradicate — capable of surviving in low temperatures and without food for long periods. A female bedbug can lay multiple eggs per day, according to the federal agency.

Clavin and Kohutka criticized the town administration for not clearly communicating with employees about the problem or what it is doing to solve it.

“That’s all we ask: just a little bit of communication and a little bit of action,” Kohutka said. “There’s absolutely none going on at the moment.”
Fricchione said town officials had discussed the situation and treatment plan with union leaders and department heads.

The infested building houses the town’s parks, public safety and economic development departments, as well as other Hempstead agencies.

Best way to search a hotel room for bed bugs

By Greg Keraghosian | Yahoo Travel | March 26, 2016

Bedbugs aren’t a big concern when you travel … unless you get them. Then they’re a blood-sucking nightmare, and they won’t just ruin your trip — they can ruin your life for months afterward if they hitch a ride home with you.

Don’t think you’ll find them only in a two-bit motel — there are well-documented cases of tourists having their upscale hotel getaways ruined by massive bedbug bites. And it’s no use traveling to a region that’s bedbug-free: The data says they can be found all over the U.S.

What’s the best way to weed out these tiny critters?  We love this video demonstration from the University of Maine, in which Jim Dill, an expert with a sweet New England accent, shows us how to look for bedbugs upon first checking into a hotel.

We combine his tips along with some other expert advice into a step-by-step guide for avoiding a bedbug-infested holiday:

Put your bags in the tub, away from the luggage rack

This should be the first thing you do after checking in, and it’s often not mentioned. While a luggage rack may be away from the bed and elevated, bedbugs could easily be hiding out within the fabric of the straps. To be extra safe, put your bags in the bathroom tub, which bedbugs are unlikely to climb into.

Cindy Mannes, vice president of public affairs for the National Pest Management Association, also says you could leave your bags at the door when you first check in: “Just don’t unpack anything until you’ve checked for bedbugs,” she told Yahoo Travel.

Start your inspection by checking the headboard

Bedbugs don’t stray far from the bed — as Dill says, their range is about 20 feet away from their host — but they’re sneaky and can play hide-and-seek better than any 5-year-old.

Take a flashlight (if you have a smartphone, it probably has one) and get a good look at the headboard, which is a common hiding spot, and don’t forget to look in the creases.

“Many people overlook the headboard because it can be difficult to remove from the wall to examine it,” Louis N. Sorkin, BCE, a consulting entomologist with Entsult Associates, told Yahoo Travel.

And just to digress for a minute, Sorkin should know bedbugs well — he stores thousands of them at home for study and keeps them alive by letting them feed on him, since he doesn’t react adversely to bites. Chuck Norris has nothing on Louis N. Sorkin.

As for what bed bugs can look like, their size and color can depend on whether they’re an adult or immature, or whether they’ve recently fed. The common rule of thumb is that they’re the size and shape of an appleseed, but Sorkin has posted examples of how that’s not necessarily so. They can be flat or plump in shape, and pale or reddish-brown in color.

Check the piping of the mattress

The crevices of a mattress’s piping make for a great bedbug hideout, so take off the sheets and look closely at the top and bottom parts.

Check the mattress or mattress pad for blood spots or poop

We know, this isn’t the most romantic way to begin a hotel stay, but other than seeing the bugs themselves, this is the best giveaway of whether any bedbugs have been feeding recently. The bloodstains can be red or brown, and the bedbugs’ poop can look like magic marker dots or marks, or raised mounds, Sorkin said. The poop residue will be light-to-dark brown or black.

Check the nearby drawers and nightstand

These make for another nice, dark hiding spot for bedbugs. Don’t just look on the corners of the inside — to be really thorough, take the drawers out from the nightstand and look under them too.

Check all other prime hiding spots

This could include the aforementioned luggage rack, bed frame, picture frames, and anything else within a few feet of the bed.

What if, gasp, you find bedbugs when you check in?

I’ll share a semi-embarrassing story: Last year I stayed at a boutique hotel in British Columbia, and minutes after checking in I saw some apple-seed-size, orange-brown bugs on the window and the windowsill.

So I did what any sane person would do: I freaked out, zipped up the bags I had placed on the floor, and ran down to the front desk. To the hotel’s credit, the guy working there immediately came up to my room to check on the problem. Which, it turns out, was no problem — they were just a species of ladybug I’d never seen (Canadians!). But he examined the mattress and the room just to be sure.

Provided what you found are in fact bedbugs, notify the front desk immediately. It’s probably OK to ask for another room in the hotel, but make sure it’s not next door or right above or below (and check that room thoroughly too).

What if, double gasp, you wake up the next morning with bedbugs?

This is the scarier scenario, because you don’t know where the bugs might be in your stuff, and you must make sure they don’t leave with you. Since the hotel is going to owe you one, insist that it launder your clothes immediately. And washing them isn’t enough: Mannes of the NPMA advises putting all fabric in a hot dryer for at least 30 minutes and steaming your luggage.

To be extra safe, before returning home place all your garments in a vacuum-sealed bag and dry them again.

If you’re wondering what bedbug bites look like, Sorkin keeps an extensive (and gross) collection of photos that include the bugs, their eggs, and their bite marks. The bites aren’t dangerous for most people — just unsightly and uncomfortable. Some people have harsh skin reactions that will require a doctor visit.

Bonus question: Could bedbugs hide on your pets?

Both Mannes and Sorkin said this is an unlikely scenario, but Sorkin added that it’s not impossible.

“There are exceptions where infestations have been allowed to proliferate due to many reasons,” he said. “Hotel staff haven’t been given proper education. I’ve seen infestations in homes where people and pet dogs and cats both had been fed upon over many months or longer.”

So just to be safe, give Checkers a good look before you check out.

Bonus question No. 2: How can I research if a hotel has bedbugs?

There are some websites where anonymous guests can report bedbug infestations at certain hotels, such as BedBugs.net and the Bedbug Registry. But there’s no way to be sure if the reports are accurate, and ultimately no hotel is 100 percent safe from bedbugs because of how easily they stow away with guests. Your best bet is to examine the room yourself.

Rankings of worst cities for bedbugs have bad news for Mid-Atlantic

Delaware News Journal | Andrew Sharp | June 4, 2019

Great news: No Delaware cities made the list of worst cities in the country for bedbugs.

The bad news: We’re surrounded.

The pest control company Terminix just released its list of the 50 worst cities in the country for bedbugs, based on the calls for service. Philadelphia was No. 1, New York was No. 2, Washington, D.C., was No. 8 and Baltimore was No. 13.

Calls to a pest control company aren’t the same as a scientific survey, so make of that what you will. Another company, Orkin, released its top 50 for 2018 in January, based on older data. It didn’t offer much peace of mind to those in the Mid-Atlantic, ranking Baltimore No. 1, D.C. 2, New York 8, and Philadelphia 12.

So while it’s hard to know for sure where bedbugs are the worst, we do know that the phones are busy in this region with reports of the little pests.

It’s only a problem if you object to creatures crawling over your bed at night while you sleep, sucking your blood.

For those paranoid about such things, Terminix offers some paranoid-sounding advice: To avoid bedbugs when traveling, “always check hotel mattresses, headboards, frames and pictures for signs of bed bugs in the room. Travelers should also wash clothes in warm water and dry in a heat chamber immediately after returning home from travel.” The company also warned that the bugs can be transported in jackets, purses, and luggage, and hide in furniture and behind baseboards.

You can almost feel those little feet crawling on you.

 

BITEMARE: East Texas Mother claims hotel was infested with Bed Bugs

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GRAND SALINE, TX | July 1, 2019 | by Mye Owens

You know the saying, “Goodnight, sleep tight, don’t let the bed bugs bite.” Well, it’s not just a nursery rhyme. Experts say bed bugs are common during this time of year and can ruin a good nights sleep.

If you’re planning a family getaway for the summer, it’s important to be aware of unwanted guests that may be waiting for you when resting away from home. Just ask Tiffany Thompson.

“The first night he had bites just up here, and I thought it was just mosquito bites,” explains Thompson, as she points out red marks on her son.

Thompson and her 1 year old son Aiden were spending the night at a hotel in Grand Saline, when the unthinkable happened.

“Just the second night, he woke up. Covered, his face, his arms,” continues Thompson.

Trying to find the cause of these bites, she pulled back the sheets, and couldn’t believe what she saw.

“I didn’t know at first, but I checked the bed, I checked around it. There were bed bugs everywhere. I didn’t even think that there would be bed bugs like that.” describes Thompson.

When she took her son to the hospital, she says doctors couldn’t count the number of bites on his body.

Bed Bug bites are more common then not.

Research shows 1 out of 5 Americans have either been bitten by a bed bug, or knows someone who has.

Experts say a good way to check if bed bugs are in your home is to flip over the covers, and check in between the mattress seams, because that’s where the insects love to hide.

“Usually it’s red, itchy, and kind of almost either in a linear pattern where they’re crawling up your skin, or a zigzag pattern where they’re going back and forth,” explains Dr. Matt Young, who often treat bed bug bites.

Doctors say the best way to treat a bite is to not scratch, and be aware if you start having more symptoms.

“If you’re having an allergic reaction, they start getting welts, and start getting itchy and then you may have shortness of breath that’s a 911 emergency,” says Dr. Young.

Because a trip to the hospital like Aiden had, could be just one bite away.

How to prevent Bed Bugs:

*Below are tips provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

  • Check all second hand furniture for any signs of insects before bringing it home
  • Use a protective cover over your mattress and box springs
  • Reducing clutter in your home, reduces the number of places the bugs can hide
  • Vacuum on a regular basis
  • Be vigilant if you are sharing laundry facilities

 

Nashville among worst bed bug infested cities in the U.S.

“Goodnight. Sleep tight. Don’t let the bed bugs bite.”

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) | Emily Luxen |June 3, 2019 — On a week where thousands of visitors from around the world will come to Nashville for CMA Fest, the city is ranked as one of the worst in the country for bed bugs.

A new survey by pest control company Terminix finds Nashville is the 18th most bed bug infested city in the country. Music City was ranked 21st last year.

Philadelphia was ranked number one in the report, followed by New York City. Memphis was ranked 17th.

Terminix said the rankings were based on the number of services the company has performed in the city in the past year.

“A lot of the problem we have here in Nashville is driven by the fact we are a transient city,” said Chris Bryant, a Service Manager at Terminix. “Summer tourism is starting to peak this time of year.”

To prevent transporting or being bitten by bed bugs, Bryant recommended people check headboards, mattresses, and sheets in hotels or Airbnbs for any signs of bed bugs.

“What you are going to be looking for looks like small black dots, like someone tapped it with a black ball point pen,” said Bryant.

Bed bugs are visible, and when fully grown are about the size of an apple seed.

Bryant also recommended hanging all clothing rather than putting it in drawers, and to keep your luggage away from the bed. When you return home from a trip, wash all your clothes in hot water.

The bugs can bite and leave behind red itchy marks on your skin. Bed bugs do not transport disease.

“Especially if it’s at night and you are in bed and you are being bitten by bed bugs, it will wake you up and cause you to itch,” said Brian Todd with the Metro Health Department.

Todd said any bed bug sighting in a hotel should be reported to management immediately. Problems can also be reported to the Metro Health Department at (615) 340-5630. It is helpful to provide the name of the hotel and the room number. The Department’s Environmental Health Bureau will look into the cases.

Bryant said Terminix hoped the study would increase awareness that bed bug sightings are on the rise, and to educate people on how to prevent transporting them.

“It just takes one to hitch a ride on you, and when you go back home, you’ve taken it with you.”

Report reveals live cockroaches, ticks, bedbugs as Branson extended-stay motel is shut down

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June 27, 2019 | by Sara Karnes

A Branson motel was forced to close after officials deigned it an “imminent health hazard” earlier this week, according to the health department.

Residents at Branson Plaza Motel, 1106 W. Missouri 76, had complained several times about the cockroach infestation and bedbug issues but were allegedly told by management not to call the health department, according to a Taney County Health Department inspection report.

Inspectors began investigating some of the unoccupied motel rooms Monday, June 24, said Lisa Marshall, the health department’s public information officer.

By Tuesday, inspectors had access to the occupied rooms. They found that pests weren’t just in one or two of them, Marshall said.

“It was a facility-wide issue,” Marshall said. “With pests carrying diseases, it’s not a safe environment.”

Of the approximately 30 rooms, 19 were occupied by long-term residents, Marshall said.

“In regards to residents, we had to shut down the facility quickly,” she said.

Live cockroaches were found in at least 24 rooms, including the motel’s basement and laundry room, according to the inspection report. Bedbugs were found in about nine rooms, and several dead bedbugs were found on the guest laundry floor.

The health department has received “multiple complaints” of cockroaches, bedbugs, ticks and ants at the Branson Plaza Motel from May 20 to June 24. Both the owner and general manager said they weren’t aware of the issues and the “tenants had not notified anyone of the concerns,” the report stated.

“Only one week of weekly room inspection records were provided for the month of June, and several records were not filled out,” the report stated. “No other records for previous weeks were available.”

Several guests said they told the manager about the cockroaches and bedbugs, and the manager either tried to self treat the room with pesticides or did nothing, the report stated. Residents told inspectors that they have not had a professional treat their room at any point.

“Due to the severity of the cockroach infestation observed throughout the entire building, this is an imminent health hazard for the occupants of the room,” according to the report.

Once the health inspectors found that the complaints were valid, Marshall said the facility has been closed.

“Ultimately, it’s the owner’s obligation that they have a facility that meets code requirements,” Marshall said.

Branson Plaza Motel’s health department permit has been pulled and it has lost its state lodging license, Marshall said.

By losing its state lodging license, Branson Plaza Motel’s business license with the city of Branson is nullified, said Melody Pettit, the city’s communications manager.

The city deployed its relocation team to assist residents in extended-stay motels. Emergency personnel, government agencies and several nonprofits work to help find other places for affected tenants to go, Marshall said.

Salvation Army Social Services Director Becky Gerhart said she has had more than 10 people from the Branson Plaza Motel have come to her office so far for assistance.

“Our project interjection was to replace food and clothing that they needed,” Gerhart said.

Many of the residents’ belongings were spoiled, out-of-date or contaminated by the infestation, Gerhart said.

About six families have also been given lodging assistance through the Salvation Army, Gerhart said.

This is the first time the health department has led the charge because of the health concerns, Pettit said.

As of Thursday, Pettit said she believed about three individuals had slept at Branson Plaza Motel.

“The situation was that because they couldn’t find anywhere to stay, the owner may be cited for the number of people who stayed there,” Pettit said.

Neither Pettit nor Marshall was sure of the exact number of residents who had been staying at the motel.

For Branson Plaza Motel to reopen, it would have to take several steps, according to the inspection report, including:

  • A service contract with a professional pest control company for the monthly preventative maintenance of pests.
  • A written, detailed treatment plan created with their professional pest control technician for how and when all of the rooms will be treated after all rooms have been vacated. Plan must have a list of scheduled treatment dates and a designated person for monitoring pest activity during process. After each treatment, all floors shall be cleaned to remove dead cockroaches.
  • A written integrated pest management plan (IPM) created with their professional pest control technician to ensure the presence of pests is minimized in the future and the facility is taking a proactive approach to ensure any pest concerns are addressed immediately and all adjacent rooms are also inspected for pests.
  • A written plan for who will be responsible for conducting the weekly room inspections, when, who will verify that the inspections are done, and what the corrective action will be if the inspections are not done.
  • Who will be accountable for ensuring all pest plans are followed and weekly room inspections are done.
  • The last 6 months of monthly professional pest control services and the treatment invoices for guest rooms with concerns.

The facility cannot self-treat for cockroaches and is not approved to self-treat for bedbugs by using pesticides or heat, the report stated

“A professional pest control company must be used for all pest services,” the report stated.

Pettit said the city of Branson is willing to work with the motel owner to regain its business license.

“That’s been our main thing — no matter how much money someone makes — everyone deserves a safe and clean place to live,” Pettit said.

A News-Leader reporter attempted to reach the manager or owner of Branson Plaza Motel by phone but was told “we don’t have any comments” before an individual at the facility hung up.

Bride says her guests had bed bugs in their Iowa City hotel rooms

IOWA CITY, Iowa (KCRG) — by Josh Scheinblum Jun 27, 2019.  The Johnson County Health Department is investigating after Jennifer Werderitsch filed a report alleging a bed bug infestation at the Hyatt Place hotel in downtown Iowa City.

Photo: MGN Online

Werderitsch tells the I9 investigative team at least nine of her guests reported seeing bed bugs and having bites and that she is upset the hotel is not doing more to address what happened.

“We know for sure that bed bugs and cockroaches were in these rooms,” said Werderitsch.

Anna Naso of Long Island, New York says she was one of those who were bitten by bed bugs. Naso tells I9 she took photos of the bugs and the bites they inflicted on her.

“I have the bites,” said Naso.

Naso wants the Hyatt to replace her luggage but Werderitsch says management has only agreed to refund one of three rooms that she insists were infested.

Hyatt’s response is among the reasons she chose to report the hotel to the County.

We showed Naso’s photos to Environmental Health Manager John Lacina with the Johnson County Public Health Department. Lacina was not able to say for sure if the photos were of bed bugs.

“We’ll check the room out, we will take the room apart, bedding apart, thoroughly investigate it for any potential bed bugs or pests that we may find,” said Lacina.

The Johnson County Public Health Department reports this is the fourth report of bed bugs this year. There were two last year and this year is already on pace to pass the seven reports in 2017.

The county only confirmed bed bugs in three cases since 2017. Lacina says that is because most bed bug reports are addressed before inspectors can get there.

Hyatt Place’s general manager, Ryan Cochran, declined our request for an interview but provided a copy of Orkin’s inspection report that found no bugs. Cochran sent the following written statement:

“It was brought to our attention by a guest believing that they had been bitten by bed bugs at our hotel. Our internal team inspected the rooms and found no evidence of pests in the questioned rooms. To confirm that mater we had the rooms professional inspected by subject matter experts in the field of pests. This is our standard operating procedure as they are the trained experts in this field. These experts cleared the rooms and provided us the written confirmation that is attached. In good will and for the hassle to our guest we did provide compensation to the guest for the inconvenience of moving rooms.”

City’s 911 dispatch center in the Bronx is crawling with bedbugs, NYPD operators say

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Emergency call operators first found bedbugs in a sixth-floor training room at the Public Safety Answering Center II in Pelham Bay on June 3, and bug-sniffing dogs have been finding the critters in several rooms where NYPD personnel operate ever since, sources familiar with the building said. (Getty Images)

As Boise grows, bed bug infestations are on the rise in the Treasure Valley

BOISE, Idaho — You may have heard of bed bugs being a problem in big cities like New York, but as Boise grows, it’s taking on those big-city problems as well.

In the past six months, Ada County Paramedics have noticed an increase in bed bug calls.

Because of more people traveling to and from Boise, Dina Hardaway, Infection Control Officer for Ada County Paramedics, said that more bed bugs are coming into our area as well.

“There is so much more international travel now; we’re getting more populated just within our city and within our county,” Hardaway said. “Just with those conditions alone, they are brought into our area.”

Due to the uptick in bed bug cases, Ada County Paramedics have spent the past few months learning new protocols, including tracking data on infestations and learning techniques on how to identify and exterminate them from equipment.

Hardaway says that while the bugs aren’t a public health crisis– because they don’t spread disease– they can still be a nuisance.

To prevent the spread of bed bugs, be sure to check the seams of mattresses and underneath base boards. Make sure to wash second hand clothing and clean up used furniture after buying it. If you’re traveling, wash all of your clothing and vacuum your suitcase.

If you do end up getting beg bugs, there’s no need to call 911– just be sure to call your local exterminator.

For more information on how to get rid of bed bugs, visit the Environmental Protection Agency’s website.