Don’t Let the Bedbugs Bite. They have returned with a vengeance.

Credit Victoria Roberts

A. Scientists believe that bedbugs have developed resistance to some insecticides, and travel is helping to spread the resistant insects worldwide.

Another major contributor is the failure of many hotels and residential landlords to identify infestations promptly, and to dispose of or treat infested bedding and carpeting.

It has been known since the 1950s that bed bugs can develop resistance to commonly used insecticides, like pyrethrin. Resistance has emerged to more products over the years.

The biological mechanisms include a thickening of the bedbugs’ exterior cuticle, so that an insecticide does not penetrate properly, and metabolic resistance, in which the insects produce extra amounts of detoxification enzymes.

Resistance can also involve something as simple as a tendency to avoid insecticidal powders.

Researchers are pursuing new control methods, especially the use of natural pesticides. One is a fungus called Beauveria bassiana.

The fungus, which infects insects, already has been incorporated into a commercially available product called Aprehend.

Can You Pick a Bedbug Out of a Lineup?

In a survey, scientists found many travelers could not distinguish bedbugs from other pests, which could have implications for hotels and the travel industry.

“Yes, we have some issues”; Pikeville apartment complex battling bed bugs

WYMT
July 10, 2019 | By Buddy Forbes

PIKEVILLE, Ky. (WYMT) – Tenants at Myers Towers in Pikeville have been dealing with bed bugs for years. This is an issue that has cost them a lot of headaches and a lot of furniture.

“We’re dealing with a whole epidemic here. Every week it’s furniture piled up,” said tenant Neil Thompson.

He said the bed bug “infestation” often results in tenants throwing out their furniture.

Jim Hobbs, Executive Director of the Housing Authority of Pikeville, said the bed bug issue is present in the building but is not an infestation.

“Bed bugs are a problem all over the country and, yes, we have some issues,” Hobbs said.

He said anywhere from 15 to 35 apartments are usually dealing with bed bugs. But, he said, the maintenance crew at Myers Towers is doing everything it can to keep the bugs out of the complex.

“When we find them, we put them on our list and treat them accordingly,” he said.

He said the tenants also hold responsibility for keeping the maintenance crew informed, and doing their part to avoid bringing in any more bed bugs.

Thompson said he agrees that the tenants should shoulder part of the responsibility, but hopes to see those in charge doing more to get the bed bugs out.

Hobbs said plans for a heat chamber are currently in the works, to help save the tenants from losing their furniture. The chamber will heat up the furniture, killing the bed bugs.

Hobbs said it will take a team effort to get the situation under control.

Brandon man discusses life after having West Nile virus

 

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (KSFY) – Nearly three years ago, Chris Kielman was doing what every South Dakota does in the summer, enjoying the outdoors.

Mosquito feeding on a human host, Photo Date: January 23, 2016 / Cropped Photo: Day Donaldson / CC BY 2.0 / (MGN)

“I specifically remember one night, when I think back to it very, very buggy. I got bit a bunch of times by mosquitoes,” Kielman said.

After that evening everything changed for him after a misdiagnosis of Swine Flu. Nearly five days after developing flu-like symptoms, Kielman was unable to move. He attempted to get out of bed one morning and collapsed.

Kielman was rushed to the ER and received the diagnosis of West Nile Neuroinvasive disease, which infects the brain and spinal cord area.

“I ended up five days in the hospital tremendous pain, headaches,” he said. “Lost my hearing in my left ear completely was told it may not come back. Fortunately, after about two months it did. And that all is neurologic and that’s the scary thing is that this isn’t physical, this is a neurologic thing that affects you, and you have no control. You’re basically along for the ride.”

Now, years later, Kielman still feels the effects of the virus. He says he is not quite at 100% and even gets tired relatively easy at times.

This year there is some good news, so far this summer we’ve seen lower temperatures which could help decrease the number of West Nile cases.

“We do have a prediction model that we run based off of temperature that’s predicted for the rest of the summer,” Dr. Joshua Clayton, South Dakota state epidemiologist, said. “And so, that predicted number puts us at 62 potential West Nile cases for the coming year.”

But, that doesn’t mean to put the bug spray down, make sure always to protect yourself if you head outdoors.

People who are at high risk for developing the virus are those who are individuals over 50, pregnant women, organ transplant patients, individuals with cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure or kidney disease, and those with a history of alcohol abuse. People with severe or unusual headaches should see their physicians.

If you do develop flu-like symptoms after getting bit, be sure to visit with your doctor.

Man sues Casper Marriott, alleging he developed serious infection from bedbug bites

Doctors confirmed that he had MRSA, a form of a staph infection that is dangerous because it is resistant to some antibiotics, as well as other issues related to the alleged bites.

Casper_Star_Tribune

by Seth Klamann | July 8, 2019

A Georgia man has filed a federal lawsuit against the owners of the Courtyard Marriott hotel in east Casper, alleging that he was bitten by bedbugs during a stay there in 2012 and later developed a serious infection to his legs.

Casper_BedBug

In this Wednesday, March 30, 2011 file photo, a bed bug is displayed at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History in Washington.  

The suit was filed in federal court last month by Frank Pascarelli, who works for the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where he “is acutely aware of diseases and infections,” according to the lawsuit. He filed the suit against Marriott, various South Dakota-based management companies that are linked to the Casper location, and James Koehler, who works for the management companies that bear his last name.

A Marriott spokeswoman directed comment to Koehler and the South Dakota companies. A message left for Koehler’s assistant was not returned Monday. An email to his company, the Koehler Organization, bounced back as undeliverable, and a third message sent via a form on the business’s website was not returned.

In the lawsuit, Pascarelli alleges that he was staying at the Courtyard Marriott in April 2012 when he woke up to discover “an enormous amount of painful, itchy, burning bites” on his buttocks and right leg. He had taken a shower the night before and had not noticed any such marks, the suit alleges.

Pascarelli eventually sought treatment at an urgent care clinic in Cheyenne, where he was working with a U.S. marshal. According to the lawsuit, he had “approximately 20” “nodules” on his upper legs and buttocks.

He went back to the clinic the next day because the marks were developing into pustules, indicating infection. The bites then grew into lesions, according to the lawsuit, and caused even more pain, while Pascarelli developed a fever.

Back in Atlanta, where the CDC is based, he was admitted to the hospital. Doctors confirmed that he had MRSA, a form of a staph infection that is dangerous because it is resistant to some antibiotics, as well as other issues related to the alleged bites.

The doctor said that the MRSA was “the result of the bed bug attack at (the) hotel during the early morning of April 9, 2012,” the suit alleges.

Pascarelli was a frequent patient of the hospital throughout April and underwent three surgeries to treat the infections. He incurred about $100,000 in debt, the suit alleges. He lost wages from his job at the CDC, the complaint continues, and is at risk of being forced to retire from the Air Force Reserve.

According to the lawsuit, he will need treatment for the MRSA for the rest of his life.

The suit does not list a specific dollar amount that it seeks, though it alleges Pascarelli could lose up to $500,000 in wages as a result of the infections.

“Defendants knew, and/or should have known, that the bed in (Pascarelli’s) hotel room at the (hotel) was infected with bed bugs,” the suit alleges, adding that the hotel and its owners “failed to take reasonable precautions, failed to implement reasonable safety inspections and/or failed to follow their own safety inspections to ensure that the (hotel) was free from insects and pests,” among other allege failures.

In a statement to the Star-Tribune, Pascarelli’s attorney, Jason Ochs, said that “bed buds have been known to be a major health issue in the hospitality industry for over a decade” and that the industry “has a duty to preemptively act in regards to this foreseeable problem in order to protect paying guests.”

BITEMARE: East Texas Mother claims hotel was infested with Bed Bugs

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GRAND SALINE, TX | July 1, 2019 | by Mye Owens

You know the saying, “Goodnight, sleep tight, don’t let the bed bugs bite.” Well, it’s not just a nursery rhyme. Experts say bed bugs are common during this time of year and can ruin a good nights sleep.

If you’re planning a family getaway for the summer, it’s important to be aware of unwanted guests that may be waiting for you when resting away from home. Just ask Tiffany Thompson.

“The first night he had bites just up here, and I thought it was just mosquito bites,” explains Thompson, as she points out red marks on her son.

Thompson and her 1 year old son Aiden were spending the night at a hotel in Grand Saline, when the unthinkable happened.

“Just the second night, he woke up. Covered, his face, his arms,” continues Thompson.

Trying to find the cause of these bites, she pulled back the sheets, and couldn’t believe what she saw.

“I didn’t know at first, but I checked the bed, I checked around it. There were bed bugs everywhere. I didn’t even think that there would be bed bugs like that.” describes Thompson.

When she took her son to the hospital, she says doctors couldn’t count the number of bites on his body.

Bed Bug bites are more common then not.

Research shows 1 out of 5 Americans have either been bitten by a bed bug, or knows someone who has.

Experts say a good way to check if bed bugs are in your home is to flip over the covers, and check in between the mattress seams, because that’s where the insects love to hide.

“Usually it’s red, itchy, and kind of almost either in a linear pattern where they’re crawling up your skin, or a zigzag pattern where they’re going back and forth,” explains Dr. Matt Young, who often treat bed bug bites.

Doctors say the best way to treat a bite is to not scratch, and be aware if you start having more symptoms.

“If you’re having an allergic reaction, they start getting welts, and start getting itchy and then you may have shortness of breath that’s a 911 emergency,” says Dr. Young.

Because a trip to the hospital like Aiden had, could be just one bite away.

How to prevent Bed Bugs:

*Below are tips provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

  • Check all second hand furniture for any signs of insects before bringing it home
  • Use a protective cover over your mattress and box springs
  • Reducing clutter in your home, reduces the number of places the bugs can hide
  • Vacuum on a regular basis
  • Be vigilant if you are sharing laundry facilities

 

CDC ALERT – DEADLY ‘KISSING BUG’ HAS INVADED NEW JERSEY

July 2, 2019 | by Matt Ryan | 943thepoint

The CDC is alerting New Jersey residents about the Triatomine bug, or ‘Kissing Bug.’ The way it infects is straight out of a horror movie.

CDC

The name ‘Kissing Bug’ came from the fact that this bug is known for biting people on the face. Guess I’ll never be sleeping again. This bug can infect animals as well. Once bitten, humans and animals run the risk of contracting Chagas.

Symptoms of Chagas include fever, fatigue, swelling, and a rash. It can, however, be deadly leading to stroke or heart failure. Chagas has even caused heart failure in dogs.

Don’t let the name fool you, this is no joking matter. ‘The Kissing Bug’ looks like this.

Steve Lenz

According to the CDC, these bugs can live indoors, in cracks and holes of housing, or in a variety of outdoor settings including the following:

  • Beneath porches
  • Between rocky structures
  • Under cement
  • In rock, wood, brush piles, or beneath bark
  • In rodent nests or animal burrows
  • In outdoor dog houses or kennels
  • In chicken coops or houses

So how do you keep these suckers out of your space? The CDC recommends:

  • Sealing cracks and gaps around windows, walls, roofs, and doors
  • Removing wood, brush, and rock piles near your house
  • Using screens on doors and windows and repairing any holes or tears
  • If possible, making sure yard lights are not close to your house (lights can attract the bugs)
  • Sealing holes and cracks leading to the attic, crawl spaces below the house, and to the outside
  • Having pets sleep indoors, especially at night
  • Keeping your house and any outdoor pet resting areas clean, in addition to periodically checking both areas for the presence of bugs

Consult a licensed exterminator when it comes to this bug.

S. Kjos via CDC

If you think that you’ve found a Triatomine bug, DO NOT TOUCH OR SQUASH IT! It’s a common reaction to kill a bug when you see one, but it’s not ideal with ‘The Kissing Bug.’

Instead, the CDC says to place a container on top of the bug, slide the bug inside, and fill it with rubbing alcohol or, if not available, freeze the bug in the container. Then, you may take it to your local extension service, health department, or a university laboratory for identification.

Surfaces that have come into contact with the bug should be cleaned with a solution made of 1 part bleach to 9 parts water (or 7 parts ethanol to 3 parts water).

If you think that you have been bitten, go to a healthcare provider immediately!

Nashville among worst bed bug infested cities in the U.S.

“Goodnight. Sleep tight. Don’t let the bed bugs bite.”

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) | Emily Luxen |June 3, 2019 — On a week where thousands of visitors from around the world will come to Nashville for CMA Fest, the city is ranked as one of the worst in the country for bed bugs.

A new survey by pest control company Terminix finds Nashville is the 18th most bed bug infested city in the country. Music City was ranked 21st last year.

Philadelphia was ranked number one in the report, followed by New York City. Memphis was ranked 17th.

Terminix said the rankings were based on the number of services the company has performed in the city in the past year.

“A lot of the problem we have here in Nashville is driven by the fact we are a transient city,” said Chris Bryant, a Service Manager at Terminix. “Summer tourism is starting to peak this time of year.”

To prevent transporting or being bitten by bed bugs, Bryant recommended people check headboards, mattresses, and sheets in hotels or Airbnbs for any signs of bed bugs.

“What you are going to be looking for looks like small black dots, like someone tapped it with a black ball point pen,” said Bryant.

Bed bugs are visible, and when fully grown are about the size of an apple seed.

Bryant also recommended hanging all clothing rather than putting it in drawers, and to keep your luggage away from the bed. When you return home from a trip, wash all your clothes in hot water.

The bugs can bite and leave behind red itchy marks on your skin. Bed bugs do not transport disease.

“Especially if it’s at night and you are in bed and you are being bitten by bed bugs, it will wake you up and cause you to itch,” said Brian Todd with the Metro Health Department.

Todd said any bed bug sighting in a hotel should be reported to management immediately. Problems can also be reported to the Metro Health Department at (615) 340-5630. It is helpful to provide the name of the hotel and the room number. The Department’s Environmental Health Bureau will look into the cases.

Bryant said Terminix hoped the study would increase awareness that bed bug sightings are on the rise, and to educate people on how to prevent transporting them.

“It just takes one to hitch a ride on you, and when you go back home, you’ve taken it with you.”

Bride says her guests had bed bugs in their Iowa City hotel rooms

IOWA CITY, Iowa (KCRG) — by Josh Scheinblum Jun 27, 2019.  The Johnson County Health Department is investigating after Jennifer Werderitsch filed a report alleging a bed bug infestation at the Hyatt Place hotel in downtown Iowa City.

Photo: MGN Online

Werderitsch tells the I9 investigative team at least nine of her guests reported seeing bed bugs and having bites and that she is upset the hotel is not doing more to address what happened.

“We know for sure that bed bugs and cockroaches were in these rooms,” said Werderitsch.

Anna Naso of Long Island, New York says she was one of those who were bitten by bed bugs. Naso tells I9 she took photos of the bugs and the bites they inflicted on her.

“I have the bites,” said Naso.

Naso wants the Hyatt to replace her luggage but Werderitsch says management has only agreed to refund one of three rooms that she insists were infested.

Hyatt’s response is among the reasons she chose to report the hotel to the County.

We showed Naso’s photos to Environmental Health Manager John Lacina with the Johnson County Public Health Department. Lacina was not able to say for sure if the photos were of bed bugs.

“We’ll check the room out, we will take the room apart, bedding apart, thoroughly investigate it for any potential bed bugs or pests that we may find,” said Lacina.

The Johnson County Public Health Department reports this is the fourth report of bed bugs this year. There were two last year and this year is already on pace to pass the seven reports in 2017.

The county only confirmed bed bugs in three cases since 2017. Lacina says that is because most bed bug reports are addressed before inspectors can get there.

Hyatt Place’s general manager, Ryan Cochran, declined our request for an interview but provided a copy of Orkin’s inspection report that found no bugs. Cochran sent the following written statement:

“It was brought to our attention by a guest believing that they had been bitten by bed bugs at our hotel. Our internal team inspected the rooms and found no evidence of pests in the questioned rooms. To confirm that mater we had the rooms professional inspected by subject matter experts in the field of pests. This is our standard operating procedure as they are the trained experts in this field. These experts cleared the rooms and provided us the written confirmation that is attached. In good will and for the hassle to our guest we did provide compensation to the guest for the inconvenience of moving rooms.”

City’s 911 dispatch center in the Bronx is crawling with bedbugs, NYPD operators say

Bronx.jpg

Emergency call operators first found bedbugs in a sixth-floor training room at the Public Safety Answering Center II in Pelham Bay on June 3, and bug-sniffing dogs have been finding the critters in several rooms where NYPD personnel operate ever since, sources familiar with the building said. (Getty Images)

EWG Calls on CDC To Monitor US Population for Monsanto’s Weedkiller Glyphosate

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2019  by  Alex Formuzis

WASHINGTON – Glyphosate, the most heavily used pesticide in the U.S., should be added to the list of toxic chemicals the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention regularly measures in the bodies of the American people, Environmental Working Group said in a letter sent today to the CDC.

A growing body of research has found that Americans, including children, are exposed to glyphosate through food sprayed with the weedkiller, and from air and water because of the widespread presence of glyphosate in the environment.

A University of California biomonitoring study of more than 1,000 older adults in Southern California found that at least 70 percent had detectable traces of glyphosate in their bodies between 2014 and 2017. That compared to just 12 percent of participants tested between 1993 and 1996, EWG said in the letter to CDC.

The dramatic increase in exposure among the participants in the California study aligns with the growing amount of glyphosate – the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup – sprayed on cropland since the mid-1990s. More than 250 million pounds were sprayed in 2016.

Most glyphosate used in agriculture is applied on Roundup-ready corn and on soybeans genetically engineered to withstand the herbicide. Increasingly, however, glyphosate is used on non-GMO wheat, barley, oats and beans. The herbicide kills the crop, drying it out so it can be harvested sooner. EWG has conducted three rounds of tests of popular oat-based cereals and snack foods marketed toward kids, and found glyphosate in nearly every sample of food.

recent review of 19 studies of the evidence of human exposure to glyphosate globally, led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, highlighted the limitations of currently available data and concluded that additional studies are urgently needed.

In the letter, EWG urged the CDC to address the lack of nationwide biomonitoring studies of glyphosate, especially exposure of young children. “The EPA’s dietary risk assessments indicate that children one to two years old likely have the highest exposure levels, comparable with EPA estimates of exposure in occupational settings – and yet real-life data on infants’ and children’s exposure to glyphosate are missing,” EWG wrote.

Some of the most recent scientific research suggests that glyphosate exposure during pregnancy can harm the developing fetus as well as the health of newborns and young children.

In 2015, the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer classified glyphosate as “probably carcinogenic” to people. In 2017, the herbicide was listed by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a chemical known to the state to cause cancer.

“A national biomonitoring effort will give epidemiologists the opportunity to study the health effects associated with glyphosate exposure,” wrote Olga Naidenko, Ph.D., vice president for science investigations at EWG, and Alexis Temkin, Ph.D., an EWG toxicologist.

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