How to banish BedBugs 24/7-365?

BedBug_Awareness_Week.jpg

Spring is here and this month is all about BEDBUGS and Preparation!  WestPoint Home, WestPoint Hospitality and Bedbug Blog Report have endorsed and recommend Live Free Bedbug Pesticide Alternative Products.

The National Pest Management Association and the University of Kentucky are highlighting bedbug prevention and response in April.  WestPoint Home, WestPoint Hospitality and Bedbug Blog Report will be educating the public on Live Free powered by KiltronX Bedbug Pesticide Alternative Products.  This month KiltronX is posting discounts, BOGOS and free travel products to  all of its Friends and Followers on Facebook and Twitter.  Sign up on Bedbug Blog Report’s Twitter and KiltronX’ Facebook and Twitter to qualify.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

This month is all about bed bugs! Yes, Bed Bug Awareness Week is a real thing and WestPoint Hospitality wants to make sure you are fully prepared to deal with the fastest growing pest problem in the hospitality industry.

The National Pest Management Association created this week to highlight bedbugs, prevention and response. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) and the University of Kentucky released results of their “Bugs Without Borders” survey, which surveys U.S. pest professionals on the prevalence of bed bugs in Americans’ daily lives. The 2015 survey found that bed bug infestations in the United States continue at high rates, with 99.6 percent of respondents having treated for bed bugs in the past year. That number – which has been consistent for the past few years – is significantly higher than 15 years ago, when only 25 percent of pest professionals reported treating for bed bugs.

“Our survey has found that residential settings and hotels continue to be the top places where pest professionals are finding and treating for bed bugs,” said Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for NPMA. “As summer travelers eagerly visit destinations, new and familiar, it’s important to remind them that the best way to stem the spread of bed bugs is to be vigilant during and after their trip.”

Henriksen added, “Being aware of surroundings while staying in hotel rooms and utilizing public transportation, as well as carefully inspecting luggage and clothes upon return from vacation, can go a long way in ensuring bed bugs don’t follow them home.”

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

If Yale can’t stop them nobody can! The Ivy League, Yale School of Medicine, has another BEDBUG infestation in dorm.

Sixth bedbug infestation hits grad dorm

April 5, 2016 | by David Yaffe-Belany and Victor Wang | Yale Daily News

A brewing controversy over the management of a series of bedbug infestations in a medical student dorm has forced the Yale School of Medicine to relocate dozens of visitors scheduled to arrive on campus this Thursday for an admitted-students event.

Around 30 admitted students were slated to spend the medical school’s Second Look Weekend, a three-day charm offensive designed to showcase the University’s appeal, in an on-campus housing facility that has suffered numerous bedbug infestations since October. The Medical Student Council met last week with administrators to ask that students be relocated to a nearby hotel after a new infestation was discovered Thursday on the eighth floor of Harkness Hall, a 172-bedroom complex located on Cedar Street directly across from Yale-New Haven Hospital. And in a Monday night email to the residents of Harkness Hall, MSC President Carrie Flynn MED ’23 confirmed that the students would stay at a local hotel at the expense of the medical school.

“Given the developing nature of this situation, we have decided that it is best to provide our accepted students with lodging in a hotel rather than Harkness,” Flynn wrote in the email.

She added in the email that the MSC plans to meet with Yale Housing and the Office of Facilities to iron out a more effective strategy for dealing with future bedbug infestations.

The infestation reported last week — the sixth since October — prompted the MSC to meet on Friday with the medical school’s Director of Admissions Richard Silverman and Admissions Administrative Assistant Barbara Watts to make the case for moving the visitors to a hotel. According to one MSC representative, who asked to remain anonymous due to the sensitivity of the topic, Silverman and Watts initially decided it would be safe to house the visiting students in Harkness, after receiving assurances from the building’s facilities superintendent, Robert Young, that the infestation was under control. Young declined to comment for this article.

But on Monday night, the admissions officers seemed to change their minds. The timing of the announcement coincided with the discovery of live bedbugs in the newly infested eighth-floor room during a follow-up inspection conducted on Monday.

“Although a careful examination of the room did not turn up any bugs, the exterminator decided to go a step further, and broke apart a plywood board that was under the mattress,” wrote Director of Graduate and Professional Student Housing George Longyear in a private email to a Harkness resident obtained by the News. “Inside the plywood board, bedbugs were found.”

In the same email, Longyear apologized for the stress the bedbug infestations have created for building residents and promised to do “everything possible to fix this situation.” Longyear did not respond to a phone call requesting comment on Monday.

The decision to relocate the visiting students to a hotel also came less than a day after News reporters contacted the medical school’s admissions department with questions about the admitted students slated to sleep in Harkness Hall.

“Admissions seemed to vacillate back and forth between taking Facilities’ word that everything was under control, versus our concerns that it isn’t,” said Kayla Isaacs MED ’19, a building resident who has closely followed the bedbug issue. “I don’t know if the impending Yale Daily News article was ultimately the reason they made this decision, but it certainly provided the situation with an extra tinge of urgency. It raised the stakes.”

Silverman and Watts did not return numerous emails and phone calls requesting comment.

Isaacs added that it would have been a public-relations “disaster” for the University to house admitted medical students in a building with a history of bedbug infestations.

“It makes no sense to take even a slight chance of having an admitted student bring bedbugs home from Yale’s Second Look,” Isaacs said. “Or to have admitted students discussing on [the online forum] Student Doctor Network the administration’s failure to protect them from unwittingly staying in a building with an ongoing bedbug problem that Admissions knew about.”

According to Harkness residents, the housing and facilities administrators’ inadequate response to previous bedbug infestations in the building raised significant doubts over whether the problem had been sufficiently contained. One resident, who said her room on the eighth floor became infested in October, complained that administrators have done a poor job communicating with residents about best practices for catching infestations.

The resident, who asked to remain anonymous because of the stigma attached to bedbugs, added that many students living in Harkness Hall feel the housing and facilities team has handled the problem with “mismanagement or even negligence.”

The resident described an incident in February in which administrators allowed a student whose room was infested to move to a different floor along with all her possessions, many of which were teeming with bedbugs. The decision to transport the belongings, which the resident described as “gross incompetence,” caused a new infestation on a different floor of the building. The student, who declined to comment on the broader bedbug issue, confirmed that her belongings carried the bedbugs to a previously uninfested floor.

“I believe Facilities is trying, but everything I’ve observed over the past few months suggests to me that they are in over their head,” the resident said. “We have been told multiple times that the problem has been resolved, only to have reports of a new room that has been affected. As far as I am concerned, if the problem is spreading, it is not under control.”

The first bedbug infestation in Harkness Hall was discovered on the eighth floor in early October. Two other rooms in the same hallway reported infestations a few days later, and a fourth was discovered in February. The fifth eighth-floor infestation was reported late last week in a different part of the same hallway that housed the first four infestations.

None of the visiting admitted students were slated to sleep on either the eighth or 10th floor of Harkness Hall. But the prospect of housing admitted students in any part of a building infested by bedbugs was apparently enough to convince the admissions office to move the visiting students.

It can be tremendously difficult to exterminate bedbugs, parasitic insects that feed on human blood and whose bites produce uncomfortable rashes. The insects, which reproduce quickly and can easily spread to adjacent rooms, thrive in bedspreads, clothing and the tiny nooks and crannies between floor and wall.

CT Pest, the pest-control company paid by the University to exterminate the bedbugs, used a heating treatment to combat the first round of infestations in October, in line with official University protocol. But the company switched to a different method to eliminate the later infestations, using the nontoxic silica dust pesticide to clear each room. Longyear confirmed in a March 2 email to a building resident that the Office of Facilities had revised its bedbug protocol after meeting with a prominent insect expert who recommended the silica dust approach.

Longyear told the same resident in an Oct. 15 email that bedbug outbreaks are generally “few and far between” at Yale.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

Outbreak of BED BUGS on British Airways flight from the U.S. to London

  • One passenger claims they were ‘nipped at 30,000ft,’ and eggs spotted
  • The Boeing 747 was taken out of service on landing, and fumigated
  • British Airways says that reports of bed bugs on board are ‘extremely rare’ 

An outbreak of bed bugs caused a British Airways passenger plane to be taken out of service.

On a flight from the US to Heathrow last week, staff are believed to have spotted the parasitic insects and logged the issue.

The outbreak caused one row in the economy section of the plane to be closed off during the Transatlantic flight.

A British Airways Boeing 747 was taken out of service after bed bugs were discovered on board last week

A British Airways Boeing 747 was taken out of service after bed bugs were discovered on board last week

One passenger told The Sun that they were 'nipped at 30,000ft, while others reported seeing 'eggs'

One passenger told The Sun that they were ‘nipped at 30,000ft, while others reported seeing ‘eggs’

The Sun reports how ‘one passenger was nipped at 30,000ft and others saw the bugs and their eggs.’

Once the Boeing 747 had landed in London, British Airways launched an investigation. The aircraft was inspected and removed from the flight schedule while the issue was resolved and the plane was fumigated.

However, days later another ‘severe’ infestation was reported as the same plane flew from Cape Town to London, according to The Sun.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

Over Christmas Holiday Another Bed Bug Ridden [4-Star] Hotel…

January 19, 2016 | by Marshanna Hester | CBS58 Milwaukee

GERMANTOWN – The pictures are hard to look at.

“I ended up with a total of 63 bites over my face, neck, arms and primarily torso,” said Kelly Mathieu.

Mathieu said the bites are from bed bugs. It’s a traumatic experience she said has scarred her for life.

“I hope they understand, although I’m just another guest to them, this was difficult to go through,” she said.

Over Christmas, Mathieu and her fiancee stayed two nights at the Radisson Blu Hotel near the Mall of America. When they got back home in Germantown, she knew something was wrong. A visit to the doctor showed she was treated for insect bites.

Mathieu then contacted the hotel who she said told her, they’d reimburse her and take care of the bug problem.

“Please forward me any pictures you’ve taken of the marks that you feel will be relevant for my report,” she read from an email.

Now, more then two weeks later, the hotel said in a statement, “Our first priority is the safety and comfort of our guests. Upon hearing of this concern, the hotel immediately contacted their vendor Ecolab, who conducted a full inspection of the guestroom and adjoining guestrooms. Their findings concluded there were no bed bugs in the rooms.”

“Someone who’s bringing a claim has a burden of proving the landlord, or owner of a property, either knew or should’ve known there was a problem there,” said attorney Jonathan Safran.

Safran said that’s what makes cases like this, slip and falls or food poisoning hard.

He said the minimal damages aren’t worth hiring a lawyer, but you still have the right to file a claim and should report it to the health department.

“You may find out others have filed a complaint,” he said.

Meanwhile, Mathieu is holding out hope she’ll be compensated for her trouble.

“For the items, probably about $500, for the emotional, that’s priceless,” she said.

The hotel is working on a resolution with Mathieu. But, she said the hotel is still going to refund her room fee, and pay for medical bills and luggage she threw away when she got home.

So how do you keep something like this from impacting your next hotel stay? We spoke with a pest control expert about the first thing you should do when you enter your room.

“You know, an inspection of the bed. I’m not saying take it all apart, you know, pull the sheets back, take a look,” said Randy Allen with Will-Kill Pest Control. “Kind of inspect the environment. If there’s anything you see and it kind of triggers something, let hotel staff know.”

Allen said you should look in the crevices of the bed for any potential bugs. Most will be no larger than an apple seed.

He said people react differently to bites, so it may be several days before you realize you have been bitten.

Allen also said the most effective way to kill the bugs is heat. To reduce the chances of bringing the unwanted guests home with you, throw your clothes into the dryer on high heat the first thing you get back.

[It is a known fact that heat has no residual effect on bedbugs and in most cases makes the bedbug infestation worse…the bedbugs hide and multiply.  A. Steiner]

#SayNOtoBedbugs!

Over half of those who participated reported that bed bugs affected someone they knew; and 38 percent had been affected by bed bugs personally.

Green Right Now Reports |Updated March 21, 2015 | by WBRE and WYOU

According to the Principal Investigators Association, 58 percent of scientists responding to a recent survey believe we are having surge of bed bug infestations.

The poll was conducted through PI e-Alert, a weekly ezine, and was sent to thousands of researchers in a wide variety of fields of science. Because response was voluntary, publisher Leslie Norins, MD, PhD., says the results should be regarded as “indicative” rather than statistically proven.

Over half of those who participated reported that bed bugs afflicted someone they knew, and 38 percent had been affected personally. Another 23 percent said the insects had troubled their “significant other” or family.

Scientists see bed bugs as real issue.

The two main sites affected were “home” (43 percent) and “hotel” (41 percent). In addition, 53 percent were aware of bed bug infestations in their neighborhood, town or state.

Asked if they were taking any special precautions for travel, the top responses were:

  • Check hotel sheets and mattress for blood stains (from previous victims) and bug feces.
  • Keep luggage off floor; hang all clothes in closet.
  • Check online travel warning boards for posting of infestation at your contemplated hotel, though it was noted these may not be accurate and often outdated.

One respondent reported bringing home bed bugs from a high-end hotel after a job interview, resulting in an eradication cost of more than $18,000.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

Over the river & through the woods – Traveling for the holidays?  Beware of these 5 BEDBUG Hotspots…

December 15, 2015 | Las Vegas Review Journal

Will you be heading to Grandma’s house this holiday season? Or taking a long-awaited vacation in a tropical location? Whether you’re driving over the river and through the woods or flying to a luxury hotel in a premier resort to ski for the week, it pays to take steps to ensure you don’t come home with some unwelcome travel companions — BEDBUGS! 

Check out these five BEDBUG hotspots to be aware of as you travel this holiday season and follow the tips for how you can avoid carrying them home with you…BEDBUGS do not discriminate – it doesn’t matter if your room is $500 per night!

1. Give them a mattress, any mattress! The presence of bed bugs has nothing to do with cleanliness or the quality of your accommodations. They’re as happy and as common in five-star hotels as they are in the guest room at Grandma’s house. As their name implies, bed bugs often frequent mattresses, so as soon as you arrive at your destination, pull back the bedsheets and inspect the mattress seams and box springs for signs of bed bugs. If you see telltale stains, spots or shed bed bug skins, alert hotel management or your host right away.

2. But anywhere is good, really. Bed bugs don’t just stick to the bed, they can infest an entire room. Before you unpack, sit your luggage in the bath tub or on a hard tile floor, and thoroughly inspect your room. Use a flashlight to look behind the headboard, under side tables and in sofas and chairs. Remove cushions from upholstered furniture and look for signs of pests.

3. Hey, nice bags!Bed bugs travel by hitching a ride, and your luggage makes the perfect luxury transport for them to accompany you on your journey home. Once you’ve unpacked, consider placing your suitcases in a plastic trash bag or protective cover for the duration of your stay. Place suitcases on the shelf in your hotel room closet. Inspect your luggage before you leave to go home.

4. They just want to be “clothes” to you. Your vacation wardrobe is also a great spot for bed bugs to hang out — and their eggs to stick around —and wait for their ride to their new home. During your stay, either place worn clothing in a sealed plastic bag or use the hotel’s laundry facilities to give clothes a hot blast through the dryer before packing them up to take home. Once you’re home, immediately run all clothes — even ones you didn’t wear — through a hot dryer for 30 minutes to take care of any bed bugs that did make it home.

5. They still like those bags.Although you took steps to protect your luggage while on your trip, it pays to give them one more good look when you get home. Unpack luggage outside the house and thoroughly inspect it before bringing it inside. Vacuum the inside of luggage before bringing it inside to be put away.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

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Information and Perspectives on Bed Bug Prevention, Protection and Safety

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Information and Perspectives on Bed Bug Prevention, Protection and Safety

Bed Bug Blog

Information and Perspectives on Bed Bug Prevention, Protection and Safety

Information and Perspectives on Bed Bug Prevention, Protection and Safety