Over Christmas Holiday Another Bed Bug Ridden [4-Star] Hotel…

January 19, 2016 | by Marshanna Hester | CBS58 Milwaukee

GERMANTOWN – The pictures are hard to look at.

“I ended up with a total of 63 bites over my face, neck, arms and primarily torso,” said Kelly Mathieu.

Mathieu said the bites are from bed bugs. It’s a traumatic experience she said has scarred her for life.

“I hope they understand, although I’m just another guest to them, this was difficult to go through,” she said.

Over Christmas, Mathieu and her fiancee stayed two nights at the Radisson Blu Hotel near the Mall of America. When they got back home in Germantown, she knew something was wrong. A visit to the doctor showed she was treated for insect bites.

Mathieu then contacted the hotel who she said told her, they’d reimburse her and take care of the bug problem.

“Please forward me any pictures you’ve taken of the marks that you feel will be relevant for my report,” she read from an email.

Now, more then two weeks later, the hotel said in a statement, “Our first priority is the safety and comfort of our guests. Upon hearing of this concern, the hotel immediately contacted their vendor Ecolab, who conducted a full inspection of the guestroom and adjoining guestrooms. Their findings concluded there were no bed bugs in the rooms.”

“Someone who’s bringing a claim has a burden of proving the landlord, or owner of a property, either knew or should’ve known there was a problem there,” said attorney Jonathan Safran.

Safran said that’s what makes cases like this, slip and falls or food poisoning hard.

He said the minimal damages aren’t worth hiring a lawyer, but you still have the right to file a claim and should report it to the health department.

“You may find out others have filed a complaint,” he said.

Meanwhile, Mathieu is holding out hope she’ll be compensated for her trouble.

“For the items, probably about $500, for the emotional, that’s priceless,” she said.

The hotel is working on a resolution with Mathieu. But, she said the hotel is still going to refund her room fee, and pay for medical bills and luggage she threw away when she got home.

So how do you keep something like this from impacting your next hotel stay? We spoke with a pest control expert about the first thing you should do when you enter your room.

“You know, an inspection of the bed. I’m not saying take it all apart, you know, pull the sheets back, take a look,” said Randy Allen with Will-Kill Pest Control. “Kind of inspect the environment. If there’s anything you see and it kind of triggers something, let hotel staff know.”

Allen said you should look in the crevices of the bed for any potential bugs. Most will be no larger than an apple seed.

He said people react differently to bites, so it may be several days before you realize you have been bitten.

Allen also said the most effective way to kill the bugs is heat. To reduce the chances of bringing the unwanted guests home with you, throw your clothes into the dryer on high heat the first thing you get back.

[It is a known fact that heat has no residual effect on bedbugs and in most cases makes the bedbug infestation worse…the bedbugs hide and multiply.  A. Steiner]

#SayNOtoBedbugs!

NYC Landlord Sues Tenant for Refusing to allow Chemicals into Apartment to treat bedbug infestation.

 The building at 2 Riverside Drive (center) had a bed bug infestation in mid-December and the landlord is suing a tenant for not complying with an extermination plan.

2 Riverside Dr. (center) ‘severe’ bedbug infestation

January 20, 2016 | by Emily Frost | DNAinfo New York

UPPER WEST SIDE — The owner of a Riverside Drive residential building is suing a renter for allegedly allowing a “severe” bedbug infestation to intensify by ignoring an exterminator’s instructions to treat the apartment after it was deemed the epicenter of the outbreak.

The landlord is suing tenant James Behan, who rents a second-floor studio apartment in 2 Riverside Drive at West 72nd Street, for more than $300,000 in damages and legal fees, according to the suit filed last week in state Supreme Court.

Behan made the infestation worse by refusing to comply with an exterminator’s demands and repeatedly re-infesting the apartment, which cost the landlord money and left the 24-unit building open to lawsuits that could be brought by other tenants, the suit said.

After hearing from several residents that there were bedbugs in their apartments, the landlord notified everyone in the building of the problem on Dec. 14, 2015, and said an exterminator would be coming two days later, the suit said.

An exterminator determined on Dec. 16 that five apartments had bedbugs and that Behan’s had the “worst infestation,” with the insects visible on the “baseboards, outlets, ceilings, and all over the furniture” of his apartment, according to the lawsuit.

Behan did not seal up infested clothing and personal items as instructed by the exterminator and was seen setting them aside in the hallway without any plastic bags to contain the critters, the suit said. He also refused to dispose of clothes and other personal property per the exterminator’s request, and did not allow the exterminator to use certain chemicals to rids his apartment of the infestation, the suit said.

Additionally, the landlord wanted the exterminator to treat Behan’s car after bugs were found there, but Behan refused to grant access to the vehicle, leading the landlord to believe the infestation spread again from his car back into the apartment, the suit noted.

The lawsuit alleges that Behan also regularly visited another location with an infestation and spread those bedbugs to his apartment. He also left his unit’s door open, the suit said.

Behan has “no valid justification” for not complying and he produced an “ongoing bedbug problem” in his apartment, as well as creating “unsafe” conditions for other tenants, who still have bedbug issues, the suit said.

In addition to hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages and legal fees, the landlord is also seeking an injunction from the court to prevent Behan from interfering with extermination.

Behan could not be reached for comment Tuesday.

The attorney representing owner 2 Riverside Drive LLC did not respond to a request for comment.

#SayNOtoPesticides!

“All Walls Down” song – The Solution to tropical diseases and the bedbug problem is through Tolerance & Mindfulness of each other

Music and song lead the message and movement to help each other.  Radiate positive vibes with the smash-hit song “All Walls Down”.

toleranceascendinghands.jpg

Enjoy this smash-hit song written by KiltronX and Joe Beaty [Mind Like Water] and produced and recorded by Tony Bongiovi at the famous Power Station Studio.   This song was created to bring awareness of the risk of Chagas disease through bedbugs and kissing bugs (aka “love bugs”).

Chagas disease has already affected as many as 50 million people in the world and as many as 1.5 million people in the U.S. alone.

We are all connected.  If the poor are more exposed to the deadly Chagas disease then we ALL are.  The free roaming love bugs & kissing bugs and undercover bedbugs do not discriminate – nor do they ask for a financial statement before sucking the blood of their victims.

Bedbugs can be found in all states and all cities and love bugs and kissing bugs have spread outward and up through all states bordering the Gulf of Mexico, along the Atlantic coast, the West coast and north.

Dr. Peter Hotez of the National School of Tropical Medicine says “low-income neighborhoods … are at greater risk for infection”.  Because of their predilection for the poor, Hotez calls these infections “the forgotten diseases [Chagas] of forgotten people”.

Chagas disease not only affects humans but also their pets – be it horses, dogs, cats, livestock.  Our pets are among the most innocent and have no protection.

Awareness and preparedness are crucial to saving lives.

#SayNOtoPesticides!