How to banish BedBugs 24/7-365?

BedBug_Awareness_Week.jpg

Spring is here and this month is all about BEDBUGS and Preparation!  WestPoint Home, WestPoint Hospitality and Bedbug Blog Report have endorsed and recommend Live Free Bedbug Pesticide Alternative Products.

The National Pest Management Association and the University of Kentucky are highlighting bedbug prevention and response in April.  WestPoint Home, WestPoint Hospitality and Bedbug Blog Report will be educating the public on Live Free powered by KiltronX Bedbug Pesticide Alternative Products.  This month KiltronX is posting discounts, BOGOS and free travel products to  all of its Friends and Followers on Facebook and Twitter.  Sign up on Bedbug Blog Report’s Twitter and KiltronX’ Facebook and Twitter to qualify.

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This month is all about bed bugs! Yes, Bed Bug Awareness Week is a real thing and WestPoint Hospitality wants to make sure you are fully prepared to deal with the fastest growing pest problem in the hospitality industry.

The National Pest Management Association created this week to highlight bedbugs, prevention and response. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) and the University of Kentucky released results of their “Bugs Without Borders” survey, which surveys U.S. pest professionals on the prevalence of bed bugs in Americans’ daily lives. The 2015 survey found that bed bug infestations in the United States continue at high rates, with 99.6 percent of respondents having treated for bed bugs in the past year. That number – which has been consistent for the past few years – is significantly higher than 15 years ago, when only 25 percent of pest professionals reported treating for bed bugs.

“Our survey has found that residential settings and hotels continue to be the top places where pest professionals are finding and treating for bed bugs,” said Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for NPMA. “As summer travelers eagerly visit destinations, new and familiar, it’s important to remind them that the best way to stem the spread of bed bugs is to be vigilant during and after their trip.”

Henriksen added, “Being aware of surroundings while staying in hotel rooms and utilizing public transportation, as well as carefully inspecting luggage and clothes upon return from vacation, can go a long way in ensuring bed bugs don’t follow them home.”

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

If Yale can’t stop them nobody can! The Ivy League, Yale School of Medicine, has another BEDBUG infestation in dorm.

Sixth bedbug infestation hits grad dorm

April 5, 2016 | by David Yaffe-Belany and Victor Wang | Yale Daily News

A brewing controversy over the management of a series of bedbug infestations in a medical student dorm has forced the Yale School of Medicine to relocate dozens of visitors scheduled to arrive on campus this Thursday for an admitted-students event.

Around 30 admitted students were slated to spend the medical school’s Second Look Weekend, a three-day charm offensive designed to showcase the University’s appeal, in an on-campus housing facility that has suffered numerous bedbug infestations since October. The Medical Student Council met last week with administrators to ask that students be relocated to a nearby hotel after a new infestation was discovered Thursday on the eighth floor of Harkness Hall, a 172-bedroom complex located on Cedar Street directly across from Yale-New Haven Hospital. And in a Monday night email to the residents of Harkness Hall, MSC President Carrie Flynn MED ’23 confirmed that the students would stay at a local hotel at the expense of the medical school.

“Given the developing nature of this situation, we have decided that it is best to provide our accepted students with lodging in a hotel rather than Harkness,” Flynn wrote in the email.

She added in the email that the MSC plans to meet with Yale Housing and the Office of Facilities to iron out a more effective strategy for dealing with future bedbug infestations.

The infestation reported last week — the sixth since October — prompted the MSC to meet on Friday with the medical school’s Director of Admissions Richard Silverman and Admissions Administrative Assistant Barbara Watts to make the case for moving the visitors to a hotel. According to one MSC representative, who asked to remain anonymous due to the sensitivity of the topic, Silverman and Watts initially decided it would be safe to house the visiting students in Harkness, after receiving assurances from the building’s facilities superintendent, Robert Young, that the infestation was under control. Young declined to comment for this article.

But on Monday night, the admissions officers seemed to change their minds. The timing of the announcement coincided with the discovery of live bedbugs in the newly infested eighth-floor room during a follow-up inspection conducted on Monday.

“Although a careful examination of the room did not turn up any bugs, the exterminator decided to go a step further, and broke apart a plywood board that was under the mattress,” wrote Director of Graduate and Professional Student Housing George Longyear in a private email to a Harkness resident obtained by the News. “Inside the plywood board, bedbugs were found.”

In the same email, Longyear apologized for the stress the bedbug infestations have created for building residents and promised to do “everything possible to fix this situation.” Longyear did not respond to a phone call requesting comment on Monday.

The decision to relocate the visiting students to a hotel also came less than a day after News reporters contacted the medical school’s admissions department with questions about the admitted students slated to sleep in Harkness Hall.

“Admissions seemed to vacillate back and forth between taking Facilities’ word that everything was under control, versus our concerns that it isn’t,” said Kayla Isaacs MED ’19, a building resident who has closely followed the bedbug issue. “I don’t know if the impending Yale Daily News article was ultimately the reason they made this decision, but it certainly provided the situation with an extra tinge of urgency. It raised the stakes.”

Silverman and Watts did not return numerous emails and phone calls requesting comment.

Isaacs added that it would have been a public-relations “disaster” for the University to house admitted medical students in a building with a history of bedbug infestations.

“It makes no sense to take even a slight chance of having an admitted student bring bedbugs home from Yale’s Second Look,” Isaacs said. “Or to have admitted students discussing on [the online forum] Student Doctor Network the administration’s failure to protect them from unwittingly staying in a building with an ongoing bedbug problem that Admissions knew about.”

According to Harkness residents, the housing and facilities administrators’ inadequate response to previous bedbug infestations in the building raised significant doubts over whether the problem had been sufficiently contained. One resident, who said her room on the eighth floor became infested in October, complained that administrators have done a poor job communicating with residents about best practices for catching infestations.

The resident, who asked to remain anonymous because of the stigma attached to bedbugs, added that many students living in Harkness Hall feel the housing and facilities team has handled the problem with “mismanagement or even negligence.”

The resident described an incident in February in which administrators allowed a student whose room was infested to move to a different floor along with all her possessions, many of which were teeming with bedbugs. The decision to transport the belongings, which the resident described as “gross incompetence,” caused a new infestation on a different floor of the building. The student, who declined to comment on the broader bedbug issue, confirmed that her belongings carried the bedbugs to a previously uninfested floor.

“I believe Facilities is trying, but everything I’ve observed over the past few months suggests to me that they are in over their head,” the resident said. “We have been told multiple times that the problem has been resolved, only to have reports of a new room that has been affected. As far as I am concerned, if the problem is spreading, it is not under control.”

The first bedbug infestation in Harkness Hall was discovered on the eighth floor in early October. Two other rooms in the same hallway reported infestations a few days later, and a fourth was discovered in February. The fifth eighth-floor infestation was reported late last week in a different part of the same hallway that housed the first four infestations.

None of the visiting admitted students were slated to sleep on either the eighth or 10th floor of Harkness Hall. But the prospect of housing admitted students in any part of a building infested by bedbugs was apparently enough to convince the admissions office to move the visiting students.

It can be tremendously difficult to exterminate bedbugs, parasitic insects that feed on human blood and whose bites produce uncomfortable rashes. The insects, which reproduce quickly and can easily spread to adjacent rooms, thrive in bedspreads, clothing and the tiny nooks and crannies between floor and wall.

CT Pest, the pest-control company paid by the University to exterminate the bedbugs, used a heating treatment to combat the first round of infestations in October, in line with official University protocol. But the company switched to a different method to eliminate the later infestations, using the nontoxic silica dust pesticide to clear each room. Longyear confirmed in a March 2 email to a building resident that the Office of Facilities had revised its bedbug protocol after meeting with a prominent insect expert who recommended the silica dust approach.

Longyear told the same resident in an Oct. 15 email that bedbug outbreaks are generally “few and far between” at Yale.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

BedBugs…they’re back or never left? at this NY High School

March 31, 2016 | by Katarina Schmieder | WIVB News 4

LACKAWANNA, N.Y. (WIVB) — 18-year-old Ryan Blair is a senior at Lackawanna High School. He says he is fed up with the bed bug problem at his school.
Ryan described what happened to his friend who allegedly was bitten during school. Ryan said, “Her neck was swollen because it looked like a mosquito bite, and it hurt her. At first, she said it didn’t hurt, but then it started to. She had bumps all over her hand.”Ryan says the girl was sent home after visiting the nurse’s office after her supposed contact with bed bugs, and says that sometimes when he gets home from school, he has some of the same symptoms.

He wishes more would be done about this problem. “It’s slowly becoming more and more of a problem in the school that we are finding more and more bugs, and it seems like the school is not recognizing it.”

On Wednesday, parents were put on alert by the school after staff found what appeared to resemble a bed bug at the school. The letter says even though they found a potential bed bug, it does not mean the building is infested. The letter goes on to say that the school has an exterminator to treat certain rooms.

Back in December, News 4 reported that the school warned parents and students after finding the bug in a classroom. But now, Ryan wants to know, why is this happening again?

He says, “It’s disgusting, and the fact that we are seeing bugs crawling around our school, not only that, but what if a student brings one home, it’s just going to cause problems all over the place.”

News 4 tried reaching out to the district superintendent for a comment, but have yet to hear back.

Below is a copy of the letter that was sent home to parents:

bed bug letter

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High School students sent home with letter “bedbugs found”

March 31, 2016 | by Taylor Stuck |The Herald-Dispatch

HUNTINGTON, WV – Huntington High School students were sent home Thursday with a letter alerting parents bed bugs were found in the school.

Jedd Flowers, Cabell County Schools communications director, said one or two bugs were found, probably “hitchhiking” in on a student.

“It’s pretty common these days,” he said. “It’s not an infestation of the building.”

Flowers said every student was sent home with a letter because the high school students travel throughout the school for classes, so it would be impossible to determine who came in contact.

The school will follow state protocol, calling in an exterminator to assess the building. Flowers said they will check for bugs and vacuum. If that does not rid the building of the problem, chemicals will be used.

Flowers said they just want to make sure parents and guardians are aware, and to ask them to let the school know if bed bugs are in their home. Cabell County Schools will help families who need assistance ridding their homes of bed bugs.

Residential bed bugs have been on the rise across the country, said Stan Mills, program manager at the Cabell-Huntington Health Department.

Mills said a couple bed bugs at the high school is as common as the school having a cricket, and the chance of a bed bug being taken home by a student is about the same chance of that student winning the lottery.

Mills said the health department worries more about people overdosing on chemicals to remove bed bugs than people having bed bugs in the first place.

“Chemicals are not the only treatment,” he said.

Bed bugs are small, oval, brownish insects that live on the blood of animals or humans. Adult bed bugs have flat bodies about the size of an apple seed.

Initial hiding places are typically in mattresses, box springs, bed frames and headboards. Bed bugs bite in the night, and a spot of blood can also be seen on sheets.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

Will We Be Forced To Welcome Our Insecticide-Resistant Bed Bug Overlords?

Bed bugs

February 23, 2016 | by Keith Wagstaff | Forbes

Bad news for people who hate bed bugs. The insects are developing a resistance to widely used chemicals, according to a new study.

Researchers tested bed bugs taken from homes in Cincinnati and throughout Michigan, and found “high levels of resistance” to neonicotinoid insecticides.

Bed bugs were a big problem until the 1930s, when use of DDT kept them in check. Then came Rachel Carson’s “Silent Spring” in 1962 and concerns over the environmental and health effects of DTT.

Over the last few decades, thanks to the rise of international air travel and declines in the usage and effectiveness of DDT, bed bug infestations have exploded. In 2015, nearly every pest control professional (99.6 percent) had to deal with bed bugs. That is up from 25 percent in 2001, according to the National Pest Management Association. Neonicotinoids looked like at least one solution to the problem — until now.

“It’s a constant arms race,” Richard Pollack, an entomologist at the Harvard School of Public Health, told me in an interview. “We find something new, it works, and then they use Mother Nature’s laboratory to come up with ways to get around it.”

The resistance to neonicotinoids might be new, Pollack said, but it’s not unexpected. Insecticides can be incredibly effective for decades at a time. But if even a tiny percentage of bed bugs are resistant, they will survive and reproduce, eventually creating entire populations that can’t easily be killed off.

In the study, published recently in the Journal of Medical Entomology, researchers found that the bed bugs from Cincinnati and Michigan were far more resistant to four types of neonicotinoids (acetamiprid, dinotefuran, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam) than bed bugs raised in a colony maintained by entomologist Harold Harlan.

Thanks to the “detoxifying enzymes” their bodies produced, the bed bugs from Cincinnati and Michigan were 33,333 times more resistant to acetamiprid than the colony-raised bed bugs. They were more than a hundred times more resistant to the other neonicotinoids, as well.

So, should we simply welcome our new insect overlords and resign ourselves to waking up covered in itchy red bites?  Not so fast, according to Pollack.

“A lot of things bed bugs have become resistant to still work,” he said. In other words, if one pesticide doesn’t kill your bed bugs, pest control workers can just try several of them until one does the trick. Chances are the bed bugs in your home won’t be resistant to them all. There are other options out there too, like fumigation and applying extreme heat to a home. (Yes, houses have caught fire during heat treatments. Nobody said insecticide alternatives were perfect.)

To be clear, it’s not good that in some areas, human beings have one less weapon in their arsenal when it comes to killing bed bugs. But that doesn’t mean that people won’t develop new pesticides— potentially ones that are more effective and less toxic than old chemicals like DDT.

“We are in a free market economy,”Pollack said. “There is money to be made by developing new products.”

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

Disturbing Map of NYC Parks/Public Areas shows Roundup herbicide Glyphosate INCREASING

February 23, 2016 | by Julie M. Rodriguez |  Inhabitat.com

Bad news, New Yorkers — if you like to take long walks or pay visits to your local park, you’ve probably been exposed to glyphosate, the cancer-linked main ingredient of Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide. In response to concerned citizen groups, the New York City government released a report last year detailing pesticide use by its agencies. And now, if you’d like to see whether you’re at risk, Reverend Billy & The Stop Shopping Choir have created a disturbing new map that charts every park and public area known to be treated with the toxic compound. You can view the map here.

The data shows that in 2014 alone, the city applied glyphosate 2,748 times within the city. While the recent numbers are alarming enough all on their own, what’s even worse is the fact that glyphosate use within the city seems to be increasing — the amount sprayed jumped 16% from 2013 to 2014.

Why is NYC drenching its parks in a chemical that World Health Organization classes as a probable carcinogen? Studies have repeatedly linked the herbicide to cancer dating back to the 1980s, and farmers have even filed suit against Monsanto alleging that exposure to glyphosate caused them to develop the disease. The company, naturally, has fought back against this research by suing states that try to regulate the use of the herbicide.

glyphosate, pesticide, herbicide, roundup, monsanto, roundup cancer link, new york city, nyc, roundup spraying

 

Glyphosate is BANNED in France, Netherlands, Bermuda and Sri Lanka.  Switzerland and Germany begin to REFUSE stocking Roundup.

While cities like NYC and San Francisco may have no problem with spraying this controversial chemical all over their streets, other governments are beginning to crack down on glyphosate use. France has banned the sale of the herbicide over the counter, along with the Netherlands, Bermuda, and Sri Lanka. In Switzerland and Germany, major retailers have begun refusing to stock Roundup even in the absence of government regulation. The evidence of Roundup’s toxic effects is strong enough for the leaders of these nations and corporations to pull it from the shelves, and New York City needs to stand up and take note.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

Alex Morgan Rips Women’s Soccer League For BedBug-Ridden Hotels

BedBugs lead to extreme measures for the National Women’s Soccer League.

Associated Press

August 18, 2015 | by Maxwell Strachan | The Huffington Post

Alex Morgan is back to playing with the Portland Thorns FC of the National Women’s Soccer League after the Women’s World Cup, and she’s apparently already tired of the lodging that the league offers.

In a tweet on Monday, Morgan directly called out the NWSL by adding their handle and saying, “there’s no other way to address continuing problems. Hotels have been unacceptable. For ex. :Bed bugs/mold @ Adams Mark Hotel in KC.” 

Google

While the tweet has since been deleted, it remains cached on Google. Morgan has not added an update saying her account has been hacked, and a similar tweet by teammate Christine Sinclair would appear to verify that the tweet is, in fact, Morgan’s.

As For The Win notes, the league’s operations manual indicates that home teams must provide away teams with rooms at a 3-star hotel. And while Adam’s Mark Hotel might technically qualify, it’s 1.9 rating leaves something to be desired.

Google

Since it’s the home team providing the hotel rooms, it’s fair to wonder whether FC Kansas City deserves some blame here. But the larger issue is one of gender inequity. Morgan has spent months and months thinking about all the ways FIFA treats the men better than the women at their respective World Cups.

Now she’s back to playing in a league with a minimum salary way below the poverty line and maximum salaries not much better than that. If you were in her situation and you suddenly realized your hotel room had bedbugs, wouldn’t that be the last straw for you, too?

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

Watch as Cavaliers’ Kyrie Irving Confirms he was bitten by BedBugs in Oklahoma City Hotel Room before Game

February 23, 2016 | by Dallas Franklin and AP Wire | NBC4

CLEVELAND – Kyrie Irving blamed bed bugs for knocking him out of Sunday’s game in Oklahoma City.

The Cavaliers star guard said following Monday’s loss to Detroit that he left the nationally televised game against the Thunder after playing just 9 minutes because he was “freaked out” and tired after he was bitten on the head by bed bugs.

“Just imagine how freaked out you’d be if you saw friggin’ five, big-ass bed bugs just sitting on your pillow. I woke up itching, and I’m just looking around, and I’m like, ‘Are you serious right now?’ It was 3 a.m., and I was so tired at that point. It was, whatever,” Irving told ESPN.

The Cavaliers stayed in the historic Skirvin Hilton Hotel in Oklahoma City on Saturday night.

Skirvin Hilton Hotel

The team said Irving was bothered by flu-like symptoms, but Irving said he got only three hours’ sleep after he saw five bugs on his pillow. He spent the rest of the night on a couch in his room.

“Our team said I was out with flu-like symptoms,” Irving said on Monday. “It was honestly from the bed bugs from the frickin’ Hilton that we stayed at.”

A spokesperson for the Skirvin Hilton Hotel confirmed with ESPN that bedbugs were found in Irving’s room.

“Unfortunately, every hotel occasionally has a case of bed bugs,” the spokesperson told ESPN. “This is one of those cases where a guest did bring in bed bugs to this particular room, and it was reported to us, fortunately, and we responded immediately and put the room out-of-order and all of the surrounding rooms to be inspected by a professional company.

“We actually had the company come out first thing [Monday] morning, and we found it was an isolated case in the one room, and we’re taking the necessary steps to remediate the problem.”

Without Irving for most of the game, the Cavs beat the Thunder 115-92.

Irving said he felt better Monday, when he scored a team-high 30 points in Cleveland’s 96-88 loss to the Pistons.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

Cavaliers’ Kyrie Irving says ‘5 big a** bed bugs’ caused him to miss most of a game

There are a lot of layers to this. Let’s take it step by step.

What hotel was this?

The Skirvin Hilton, which you might recognize because it’s notoriously haunted by Effie, a housekeeper who supposedly jumped from one of the top floors. The New York Times wrote about it in 2014. Most NBA teams stay at this hotel when they visit Oklahoma City.

Was it actually bed bugs?

I am a young person who still has much to learn about the ways of the world, including what exactly happens when you get bed bugs, so I asked the adults of SB Nation for help here.

“They live in the bedding — like the mattress — and they come out to bite you and drink blood … but they will travel home with you in your luggage and infest your home or the next place you stay, too,” Sam Eggleston told me.

“If you get bed bugs, you have to buy new everything,” said Matt Ufford, noted bed bug expert.

Irving didn’t say anything about buying new clothes or infecting the whole team, so maybe they weren’t traditional bed bugs.

Could they have just been bugs in bed?

This is my theory, and let’s go to The Skirven’s Yelp page for evidence. First, we should note they have a four-star rating, so most people who stay there don’t have to sub out of NBA games the next day because of nausea.

Secondly, though, there’s a one-star review a little ways down the page that stands out left by a one “Matt O.” While it’s possible Matt O. is actually Kyrie Irving, I have my doubts, mostly because Kyrie’s first name is Kyrie, not Matt, and his last name doesn’t start with an O.

In his very poor review of The Skirven, Matt O., who is probably not Irving, also complains about bugs. He even leaves a picture! Here it is.

Ufford, noted bed bug expert, says that isn’t a real bed bug. Instead, it’s just a bug that was in a bed. After all, that bug is dark colored and quite large, while bed bugs are small and usually light colored. And Irving did say this about the bugs.

Twitter:  10:19 pm – 22 Feb 2016 – Jason Lloyd ‎@JasonLloydABJ  Kyrie Irving: “Just imagine how freaked out you’d be if you saw friggin 5, big ass bed bugs just sitting on your pillow. I woke up itching.”

So what’s our conclusion here?

Irving did not actually have bed bugs. Otherwise, he would have had to burn all his clothes and pretend to be Matthew Dellavedova until they ordered him a new jersey. Instead, he just had bugs in his bed, which is understandably disturbing and a very valid reason to have trouble sleeping. I sure hope I don’t have trouble sleeping tonight just because I wrote this.  [“…just bugs in his bed?” or “…just bed bugs in his bed”.  A. Steiner]

Fortunately, Irving has overcome his bed bug demons and played better on Monday, although the Cavaliers lost anyway. Here’s to an entire season where he shuts down the critics who say he will never recover from the 2016 Bed Bugs Incident.

Oh damnit. I’m itching now.

Update: The Skirven did confirm one case of reported bed bugs on Sunday, per The Oklahoman. While I still stand by my hypothesis as scientifically plausible, it seems that we might actually be dealing with a new strain of bed bugs here. Or perhaps Ufford is not the expert he led me to believe he was. Either way, I’m sure Russell Westbrook was somehow involved in this incident.

* * *

February 23, 2016 | by Tom Ziller | SB Nation

OH HEAVENS NOOOOOO: Kyrie Irving was all sick and unable to play Sunday against the Thunder because … his hotel room in Oklahoma City had bed bugs, who bit Kyrie on the face and generally terrorized him. Burn that hotel to the ground, y’all. With his luggage and clothes and everything. Fire is the only cure for the persistent itchy feeling everyone near Kyrie will feel for the next month.

Watch the lifecycle of parasite that causes deadly Chagas disease – transmitted by the Kissing Bug…aka the Love Bug – both cousins to the BedBug

The cause of Chagas disease is the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to humans from a bite from an insect known as the triatomine bug. These insects can become infected by T. cruzi when they ingest blood from an animal already infected with the parasite.
This video was produced by Dirceu Esdras Teixeira, Marlene Benchimol, Wanderley de Souza and Paul Crepaldi on August 30, 2012.

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