Bed Bug Infestation Sweeping Metro Denver

FOX31 – July 18, 2017, by Keagan Harsh

DENVER — Tourists are coming to Colorado in droves this summer, and it’s not just visitors of the two-legged kind.  Our state is seeing an infestation of bed bugs.

Christina Thomas experienced it first hand. Thomas was visiting an Extended Stay America in Colorado Springs and says she woke up to find bed bugs all over her pillow.


“I woke up and three inches from my face I see a spot, and I look at it and say ‘no way, is that a bed bug?'” she said.

Christina isn’t the only person dealing with bed bugs in Colorado.

Jacob Marsh is one of several Denver exterminators absolutely overwhelmed with bed bug calls.

“It’s infestation levels over the whole city pretty much,” he said. “Right now we’re working 6 or 7 days a week,” said Marsh.

He says this is the worst time of year for bed bugs. However, Colorado’s infestation actually began several years ago. He estimates more than 3,500 homes are treated for bed bugs in the Denver area every year.


It’s a problem Marsh attributes to both the state’s growing population and Colorado’s popularity as a tourist destination.

“Denver is usually ranked 4th to 6th worst in the nation. We get a lot of good things when things are booming like it is, but unfortunately when people are coming in and traveling you also get a lot of unwanted visitors,” he said.

If you’re staying at a hotel there are things you can do to try and keep the bugs away.

First, store your luggage away from the bed on luggage racks or even in the bathroom.


Also, check the sheets, mattress, and bed frame for signs of the bugs.

One of the biggest misconceptions about bed bugs is that they’re too small to see. Most are actually about the size of an apple seed, and similar in appearance.

As for Christine Thomas, she isn’t taking any chances. She checked out of the hotel and left.
  

BedBugs Plague New Jersey Library – Summer Reading?

 

June 29, 2016 | by Miranda Leah for FiOS1

City officials say that after receiving a complaint, staff at the South Orange Library found bedbugs inside the library furniture.

Library patrons say they’re not surprised by the news, and extermination experts say that anyone who has visited the library should thoroughly examine their homes for the bugs and bug bites.

Community members say they just hope the library takes care of the problem quickly.

There is no word yet on when the library will re-open.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

Outrage after woman deliberately releases BedBugs into wild due to her Buddhist principles

Releasing animals into the wild may seem like a humane thing to do, but the practice is attracting controversy in China, reports Popular Science. 


In April, a woman in the Yunnan province, who regularly reports on the animals she frees, shared news of setting loose bedbugs and around 127 pounds of snakes, according to China Daily.

While she and other such liberators are acting on long-held Buddhist principles where sending captive animals back into the wild is considered to be a benevolent act, the consequences can be harmful. 
One insect expert points out that during a previous release, the non-native and highly invasive golden apple snail brought significant damage to important crops. 
Observers have also noted that some captive animals likely lack the survival skills needed to live in the wild.
Last month, when officials tried to recapture foxes that had been released around a Beijing suburb, they found that many of the members had starved to death.

Dad captures video of live Bed Bug on newborn son hours after wife gives birth at Indiana IU Methodist Hospital

May 2, 2016

Fox 59 INDIANPOLIS, IND. – An Indianapolis man is speaking out against IU Methodist Hospital after he says he found a bed bug crawling on his wife’s hospital gown, just hours after she gave birth.

“Look at this, this is a bed bug,” says Jayson Everett.

In a live video stream that now has more than 25,000 views, Jayson Everett captures raw video of an alleged bed bug crawling around on his wife’s hospital gown at IU Methodist.

“This is disgusting, I have a newborn in there,” says Everett.

Everett tells FOX59 News that he found the bug just hours after his son was born on Friday, crawling around next to his newborn while his wife was trying to breastfeed. One of the staff members in the video does admit that it looks like a bed bug, and says they will take care of it.

“It was the IU Medical wrap with the IU logo on it that they put him in and as soon as we got him stripped all the way down, a bed bug fell out. I went out to the nurse’s station and said there is a bed bug in here!” says Everett.

Everett’s claims became more heated towards the IU staff, which needed to call security to try and calm the situation. He was escorted out of the hospital and says he has not been allowed back inside to see his wife or new baby for two days, he feels penalized for speaking up about the alleged incident.

IU Health Methodist Hospital released this statement “We take this matter seriously and are looking into the details of the situation.”

Everett is worried that his wife and baby may have been bitten by the bed bug that is best known for feeding on human blood.

“Your hospital is dirty, so I have to pay for it because I blew the whistle? Not my fault, you should have told the public a long time ago,” says Everett.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

Pesticide that killed two Utah girls used across from Highlands Ranch school, a “bedroom community” of Denver

April 25, 2016 | by Mark Boyle |Denver7 ABC

HIGHLANDS RANCH, Colo. – A toxic chemical that killed two young Utah girls in 2010 is being used across the street from a school in Highlands Ranch.

Aluminum Phosphide, otherwise known as Fumitoxin, is a chemical that most parents have never heard of, but it’s commonly used around Colorado.

Denver7 has learned that in early March, Shea Homes hired Animal and Pest Control Specialist to poison prairie dogs in a field at Plaza Drive between Broadway and Lucent Boulevard across from STEM School and Academy and several other businesses, including BackCountry CrossFit and Waterworks Aquatics.

Parents of children at STEM School and Academy tell Denver7, they learned the field was poisoned nearly three weeks after it happened.

Denver7 found that none of the businesses in the area, nor school administration, were directly notified about the poisons use.

“I thought maybe I had missed a memo or something, I went into the school last week and I asked them ‘Did I miss a memo, how did we not know about this poison?’ and they said ‘Well, we don’t know about this poison,’ said Sarah Fischer, the mother of a child at the school.

According to the Colorado Department of Agriculture, a company using Fumitoxin only has to make notification with a sign on the property that only has to be left up for a few days after the poisoning is complete.

A photo of the sign sent to Denver7 shows the poisoning was from March 3 to March 7, 2016.

Businesses and school administration tell Denver7 that just because the law doesn’t force a company to make direct notification that the toxin is being used, it’s still the courteous thing to do with hundreds of school children across the street.

“I’m guessing they probably didn’t think through, it is a vacant land and they probably didn’t think about the 1300 students here, if they thought about it, they probably would have notified us,” said Penny Eucker, the principal of STEM School and Academy.  “Ideally, you wouldn’t want poison so close to a school. But we were contacted, but it is private property, they’re getting ready to develop it.”

Fumitoxin comes in small tablets.

According to the National Pesticide Information Center, Fumitoxin tablets are dropped into prairie dog holes and then covered up.  The toxin is activated by moisture, which then fills the prairie dog tunnels with toxic gas.

The Colorado Department of Agriculture said Fumitoxin gas is 20 percent heavier than air, causing the gas to sink into the holes and not rise up into the air and atmosphere.

“Once it dissipates, those residues are completely gone, also it doesn’t affect seed germination, so it’s a product that is certainly necessary to control stored product pests and then in burying rodent control, we see those applications as well,” said John Scott, Pesticides Program Section Chief for the Colorado Department of Agriculture.  “There’s virtually no potential of any exposure of it actually coming up from the surface and that potential for people being exposed for people walking by the area.”

According to the National Pesticide Information Center, the toxin can last up to 72 hours.

By law, Fumitoxin can’t be used within 100 feet of a building where humans reside.

Advanced training is also required for anyone using the chemical.

Fischer warns that many children in that area walk within a few feet from some of the prairie dog holes on their way to and from school.

“The rule is, it’s supposed to be 100 feet from the building, but that does not factor in the fact that kids are walking within the fence line,” said Fischer.

Denver7 spoke with the owner of BackCountry CrossFit who has athletes running on Plaza Drive every day.  He wasn’t concerned about his athletes being indirectly poisoned, but preferred they had been directly notified of the plan.

Reports show that too much gas too close to home was the cause of the death of the two Utah girls who were exposed to the gas.

Denver7 witnessed more prairie dogs alive in the field across from STEM School and Academy and parents of the school are now concerned about a second round of poisoning with the same lack of notice.

“I don’t understand why this poison has to be used and it doesn’t cost anything to give a call to the businesses and the schools,” said Fischer.

Denver7 made several attempts to contact Shea Homes and Animal and Pest Control Specialist, but those calls were not returned.

 #SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

Bed Bugs that feed (on YOU) are more likely to survive pesticide exposure

bedbug_eating.jpgJanuary 26, 2016 | by Entomological Society of America | ScienceDaily

Bed bugs that take blood meals after being exposed to pesticides are more likely to survive, according to research. The researchers suggest that insecticide efficacy testing protocols should be changed so that they include using recently fed bed bugs, and that bugs that are fed one to three days after being exposed to pesticides.


Many studies have been done on how effective certain pesticides are when they are applied to bed bugs. However, most have not allowed the bed bugs to take a blood meal after being exposed to pesticides, which can change the mortality rates, according to an article in the Journal of Medical Entomology.

Researchers from Rutgers University found that bed bugs that were allowed to feed after being treated with insecticides either had greater rates of survival, or they took longer to die than bed bugs that were not allowed to feed after being treated.

“Our results indicated that post-treatment feeding significantly reduced or slowed down bed bug mortality,” the researchers wrote.

In one case, bed bugs that were unable to feed after being sprayed with an insecticide had a mortality rate of 94 percent. But bed bugs that did feed after being sprayed with the same insecticide had a mortality rate of just 4 percent after 11 days.

This difference is important because most experiments that test the efficacy of insecticides against bed bugs are performed in labs where the bed bugs can’t feed after being exposure. However, in the field, bed bugs can feed after being treated with an insecticide, and the reduced or slowed mortality could give them a chance to reproduce.

“Many of the insecticides labeled for bed bug control may not be as effective as claimed, because of the inadequate testing method,” said Dr. Narinderpal Singh, one of the co-authors. “People often use laboratory bioassay results to predict field performance of an insecticide. It is important the testing conditions are similar to what would occur in the field. Current established test protocols for bed bug insecticides do not provide bloodmeals to bed bugs during the test period. We suspect the mortality data typically observed might be different if the tested bed bugs were provided a bloodmeal during the observation period.”

The researchers suggest that feeding “stimulates detoxification enzymes responsible for insecticide resistance,” which is why more bed bugs survive after taking bloodmeals, so using insecticides in tandem with other control methods is the best option.

“Incorporating non-chemical methods into bed bug control is very important in order to achieve good results,” said Singh.

The researchers also suggest that insecticide efficacy testing protocols should be changed so that they include using recently fed bed bugs, and that bugs that are fed one to three days after being exposed to pesticides.


The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Entomological Society of America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.  Journal Reference: Narinderpal Singh, Changlu Wang, Richard Cooper. Posttreatment Feeding Affects Mortality of Bed Bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) Exposed to Insecticides. Journal of Economic Entomology, 2015; tov293 DOI: 10.1093/jee/tov293


[Examples of non-chemical methods include vacuuming visible bed bugs, laundering bed sheets and infested clothing using Live Free Dryer Strips, using Live Free Mattresses Covers and Live Free Box Spring Wraps and installing Live Free Leg Booties around the legs of beds and upholstered furniture.]

 #SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

‘Chagas Considered Emerging Global Disease’ – CSUF Researchers study spread of Plague to Parasites. Note, Kissing Bugs are cousins to Bed Bugs.

This Year’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ Produce Named Worst for Pesticide Exposure – and ‘Clean 15’

Strawberries.jpg

April 12, 2016 | By Ashley Hayes | WebMD Health News

Strawberries claim the top spot on this year’s “Dirty Dozen” list of produce containing pesticides, according to the Environmental Working Group (EWG).

Apples, which had topped the annual list for the past five years, dropped to second. The list was released Tuesday.

Nearly all strawberry samples tested – 98% — had detectable pesticide residues, according to the advocacy group. Forty percent had residues of 10 or more pesticides, while some had residues of 17 different pesticides.

Some of those chemicals are “relatively benign,” according to the organization, but others may be linked to diseases, hormone disruption, neurological problems and reproductive or developmental damage.

“It is startling to see how heavily strawberries are contaminated with residues of hazardous pesticides,” says Sonya Lunder, EWG senior analyst, in a statement. The levels are acceptable under current regulations; Lunder called for government levels to be updated to reflect the latest research.

Avocadoes, meanwhile, topped the EWG’s “Clean Fifteen” list, of produce least likely to be tainted by pesticides.

The group bases its analysis on testing of more than 35,000 samples by the USDA and FDA. USDA washed and peeled the produce to mimic what consumers do at home.

The annual report has received criticism, with some experts saying the rankings are arbitrary and there’s no need to fear conventionally-grown produce .

The “Dirty Dozen” list has been “discredited by the scientific community,” the Alliance for Food & Farming, a nonprofit group including about 50 agricultural associations, commodity groups and individual growers and shippers, in a statement Tuesday.

The EWG bases its report on the USDA Pesticide Data Program report, the Alliance for Food & Farming says, but the USDA has said those findings “pose no safety concern.”

Before a pesticide can be used, the EPA must determine “that it will not pose unreasonable risks to human health or the environment.”

For its part, the EWG says on its website it “always recommends eating fruits and vegetables, even conventionally grown, over processed foods and other less healthy alternatives.”

The 2016 Dirty Dozen list:
1. Strawberries
2. Apples
3. Nectarines
4. Peaches
5. Celery
6. Grapes
7. Cherries
8. Spinach
9. Tomatoes
10. Sweet bell peppers
11. Cherry tomatoes
12. Cucumbers

Also of note, according to the EWG, are leafy greens such as kale or collard greens and hot peppers. While those foods did not meet traditional ranking criteria for the Dirty Dozen list, they are “frequently found to be contaminated with insecticides toxic to the human nervous system,” according to the report.

The 2016 Clean Fifteen:
1. Avocados
2. Sweet corn
3. Pineapples
4. Cabbage
5. Frozen sweet peas
6. Onions
7. Asparagus
8. Mangoes
9. Papayas
10. Kiwi
11. Eggplant
12. Honeydew melon
13. Grapefruit
14. Cantaloupe
15. Cauliflower

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

 

 

How much evidence is needed ? Study released on effects of low dose pesticide poisoning…NYC

 

April 5, 2016 | by Michael Howell | Bitterroot Star

Local wildlife rehabilitator Judy Hoy is one of the authors cited in a study recently published in the International Journal of Human Nutrition and Functional Medicine which claims to demonstrate that even low doses of glyphosates, a chemical ingredient in many pesticides, can be considered a serious health problem. Lead author of the study is Nancy Swanson, PhD from Abacus Enterprises in Washington state, and Stephanie Seneff, from the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston. The article is entitled: “Evidence that glyphosate is a causative agent in chronic sub-clinical metabolic acidosis and mitochondrial dysfunction.”

The article claims that it is a well-established fact that ingesting large amounts of glyphosate causes metabolic acidosis and other pathophysiologic changes. Clinical signs of acute glyphosate poisoning include severe acidosis determined by low blood pH, hyperkalemia, hypernatremia, raised creatinine and blood urea levels, hypotension, hypoxemia and reduced serum bicarbonate. Severe poisoning causes dehydration, pneumonitis, oliguria, altered level of consciousness, hepatic dysfunction, pulmonary edema and dysrhythmias 1, 2, 3.

The authors go on to claim, however, that available scientific reports and records from the CDC examined and compared in their study provide overwhelming “circumstantial evidence” that ingestion of glyphosates in low doses also has serious health effects which are being overlooked in toxicology evaluations and public policy.

“How much evidence is needed?” they ask in the article.

“Taken together, this evidence suggests that glyphosate, in the doses equivalent to allowed residues in food ingested over a long period of time, causes a low-grade, chronic acidosis as well as mitochondrial dysfunction,” states the study.

They also provide evidence from the literature supporting the biochemical pathways whereby this occurs by extracting the reports for symptoms and diseases associated with glyphosate from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Adverse Event Reporting System database. These are compared to the symptoms and diseases reported in the database for drugs that are known to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. They call the results “startlingly consistent.”

Finally, they hypothesize that many modern diseases are primarily acquired mitochondrial disorders caused by chemical pesticides, pharmaceutical drugs, food additives and industrial chemicals.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

How to banish BedBugs 24/7-365?

BedBug_Awareness_Week.jpg

Spring is here and this month is all about BEDBUGS and Preparation!  WestPoint Home, WestPoint Hospitality and Bedbug Blog Report have endorsed and recommend Live Free Bedbug Pesticide Alternative Products.

The National Pest Management Association and the University of Kentucky are highlighting bedbug prevention and response in April.  WestPoint Home, WestPoint Hospitality and Bedbug Blog Report will be educating the public on Live Free powered by KiltronX Bedbug Pesticide Alternative Products.  This month KiltronX is posting discounts, BOGOS and free travel products to  all of its Friends and Followers on Facebook and Twitter.  Sign up on Bedbug Blog Report’s Twitter and KiltronX’ Facebook and Twitter to qualify.

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!

This month is all about bed bugs! Yes, Bed Bug Awareness Week is a real thing and WestPoint Hospitality wants to make sure you are fully prepared to deal with the fastest growing pest problem in the hospitality industry.

The National Pest Management Association created this week to highlight bedbugs, prevention and response. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) and the University of Kentucky released results of their “Bugs Without Borders” survey, which surveys U.S. pest professionals on the prevalence of bed bugs in Americans’ daily lives. The 2015 survey found that bed bug infestations in the United States continue at high rates, with 99.6 percent of respondents having treated for bed bugs in the past year. That number – which has been consistent for the past few years – is significantly higher than 15 years ago, when only 25 percent of pest professionals reported treating for bed bugs.

“Our survey has found that residential settings and hotels continue to be the top places where pest professionals are finding and treating for bed bugs,” said Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for NPMA. “As summer travelers eagerly visit destinations, new and familiar, it’s important to remind them that the best way to stem the spread of bed bugs is to be vigilant during and after their trip.”

Henriksen added, “Being aware of surroundings while staying in hotel rooms and utilizing public transportation, as well as carefully inspecting luggage and clothes upon return from vacation, can go a long way in ensuring bed bugs don’t follow them home.”

#SayNOtoPESTICIDES!